TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on March 13, 2015 6:11 pm
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

aqeRyR
aqeRyR
Reps: 101
ADHD Student
This year in a class that I co- teach, we have a sweet young man who is extremely ADHD. At the beginning of the year, he was fairly diligent about completing assignments and turning in his work. This second half of the semester he is barely turning anything in. Also I have to constantly redirect his attention more than usual and literally stand over him to help him complete an assignment. The counselors and myself learned that he is no longer on his medication and there is no sight that he will be put back on it due to financial issues. Any suggestion on how to handle this situation would be greatly appreciated.
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 1:49 pm

myqydy
myqydy
Reps: 102
I have had an ADHD student in the past that responded well to checklists. I would give him a checklist for each segment and provide him with exactly what he needed to do step by step. When he was off task I would ask him what step he was on. It helped. Remember it is not his fault and if you are patient and positive with him, he will try his best to stay on task to the best of his ability.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 1:30 pm

ybereD
ybereD
Reps: 104
I agree that you should chunk assignments into smaller ones. Similarly, try including some type of physical activity into your assignments or possibly allowing this student to stand while working.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted March 14, 2015 12:35 am

byMabu
byMabu
Reps: 101
I use a sand timer with my ADHD students. I chunk up assignments and tell them what portion they must have finished before the sand runs out. It keeps them focused.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted March 14, 2015 8:53 pm

eTypaX
eTypaX
Reps: 103
I think you should definitely break apart his day. Maybe for every assignment he finishes he gets rewarded with something he likes. Some of my ADHD children I let stand to do their work or I put them by themselves to finish their work so they are not distracted. I tell them that it is not a punishment just a special place to help them get finished. I do give them the opportunity to try and join their friends but if I have to say anything they move back.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted March 15, 2015 2:10 pm

yqeSeL
yqeSeL
Reps: 102
I have a friend who uses a timer. The timer is set on the student's desk and the student has to race against the timer to complete certain tasks. The trick is through, that the teacher ask the student how long he/she thinks it would take them to complete the tasks (within reason of course) and the student is able to make his/her own boundaries, setting the time themselves (if capable). Giving students a choice or say in their learning can sometimes aid in encouragement.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted October 18, 2015 10:54 pm

VuGuGu
VuGuGu
Reps: 127
I have a couple student in this situation as well. Those students understand that if they complete their assignment and there is time left in the class period, they are able to go to the sensory table. This allows them to use their hands and move around a bit. They are usually excited go ahead and finish for that moving time.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted October 19, 2015 12:59 am

Erica Turnbull
Erica Turnbull
Reps: 78
Chunk up the assignment is a great idea with small breaks in between. Use a time to your advantage. For example, when they finish 5 problems then the get a 2 minute break, and once the timer goes off they must do the next set of problems. I found it very helpful for a student to have a fidget fix during the small breaks. An exercise band tied to the chair allows students to put their feet on it to fidget while staying in their seat.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 8
Posted October 7, 2016 2:29 am

Krystalynn Gulczewski
Krystalynn Gulczewski
Reps: 203
I would try and help the family work with the school counsler to find out of there are any programs that can help put the student back on the medication. I would also try implementing more non verbal cues with the student. Also check lists on classwork can help as well as tutors or one on one time with the student in oreder to get the work done.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.