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Posted on March 13, 2015 7:19 pm
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
Questioning
In depth questioning is something that is a must in my classroom, especially with the inception of testing that ask students to think more deeply. My problem is that when I ask those high order thinking questions student just sit there with blank stares and no one responses. When I then ask the question in a different form I feel that I am just "dumbing" down the question and the purpose is lost. What are some things I can do to increase my questioning depth without "losing" the students?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 13, 2015 7:29 pm

aqeRyR
aqeRyR
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I completely relate here, sometimes I see those stares more than I'd like. Typically I notice that when I am asking or challenging students with higher order thinking questions, the vocabulary within those questions might be unknown or unfamiliar to students, specifically my ELL and LLL students. What I have started doing is as part of our warm up we define the meaning of these larger vocabulary words. At this time I also provide students with other meanings of the words and then we use them in a sentence. I have definitely noticed that by becoming more familiar with these words and using them inn the class more regularly, that students are able to perform better on these more in depth assignments and questions.
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
Thank you for your help!
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:23 am

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Solution 2
Posted March 14, 2015 1:16 am

ezeDeZ
ezeDeZ
Reps: 107
I had this problem earlier this year. I too incorporated vocabulary into my lessons more, but I also had to backtrack and starts with a little at a time. For example, I asked and answered my own question, but had my students help find the evidence/proof. This kind of introduced them to using the text to understand the question better.
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
Thank you I like your suggestion.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:23 am

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Solution 3
Posted March 14, 2015 1:55 am

yTaSuD
yTaSuD
Reps: 128
Try as hard as you can to relate the topic you are discussing to a classroom conversation that involves pop culture or something the students are interested in. Once the students are interested and their guards are down, slip in the higher order question and even have students discuss in small groups. Also, you can always over some incentives for answering questions correctly.
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
I like your suggestion of groups.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:24 am

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Solution 4
Posted March 15, 2015 4:25 pm

QeRary
QeRary
Reps: 101
Have you thought about scaffolding your question? You may start at lower level question and build your way up to higher order thinking? You may want to model question and answering for the students as well. That way they will begin to understand what you are asking and how to answer you. I have been in similar situations and usually answer the question for them after a wait time. When they hear the answer they begin to understand how to connect what they learned to the questions I am asking. Sometimes the students need help in learning how to think analytically and by modeling you are showing them how.
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Solution 5
Posted March 14, 2015 5:44 pm

PejuQe
PejuQe
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Maybe you could have the students write the answers to your questions. This might get their brain "working" and allow them to begin thinking more deeply about the question. Once they begin writing they can see how little or how much they know about what you are asking them.
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
I like that idea of them writing the answers. That could activate more in depth thinking.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:26 am

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Solution 6
Posted March 14, 2015 2:19 am

yQadyH
yQadyH
Reps: 128
I think that practicing answering these types of questions first would be beneficial. Also, you need to make sure that everyone understands the question and your terminology. You could also show examples of someone answering a higher order question and comment/discuss about what he or she had to do in order to come about that conclusion.
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
Thank you for your help. I like the roll play idea.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:25 am

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Solution 7
Posted March 14, 2015 12:54 pm

aGudyS
aGudyS
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As I have read in other comments, I believe that increasing the vocabulary prior to implementing the lesson is crucial. I teach students with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. When I ask higher order thinking for these students, I try to provide examples and give prompts. The idea is to get the students to think beyond what is explicit, even if you have to provide some prompting. Eventually, you will want to reduce the amount of prompting you have to provide when asking higher order thinking questions. It is important that you don't think of it as "dumbing it down," but as teaching a new skill.
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qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
Thank you for your help.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:26 am

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Solution 8
Posted September 29, 2015 2:18 pm

neraXe
neraXe
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I am in a high school classroom and even there I receive blank stares and silence. The verbiage of higher order thinking questions can be tough for students however, it can also simply be re-worded into language that your students can comprehend. I would go through examples as a class and discuss how to break down a tricky or wordy question and figure out what it is asking for. It is also very important to give students wait time to process what was asked and formulate an answer for higher level questioning. There is a difference between students with blank stares because they do not understand and students who do not want to do the work. Encouraging students with a simple reward may help some students to at least attempt the problems.
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deRudu
deRudu
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I agree about students and their blank stares. I wonder have you considered incorporating a discussion board in your teaching. It is a great way for get those shy students involved. Once a student or two respond< I find that the remainder of student are able to begin a much deeper discussion. Just a thought. I have experienced great success with it. The good thing is that the teacher can read and monitor. There is always an opportunity to remediate or redirect if and when necessary. Also, it almost always provides a lead in for the next day's discussion or question.
  Posted on: October 11, 2015 5:01 am

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Solution 9
Posted October 18, 2015 10:14 pm

GaXyve
GaXyve
Reps: 76
Perhaps you could begin by building the depth of knowledge of questions until students feel comfortable responding. Additionally, you could allow students to respond in various modes as opposed to just orally. Allow them to respond on post-its, index cards, or chart paper in small groups. You may discover your students know more than they are willing to share orally.
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Solution 10
Posted March 15, 2015 2:13 pm

ybereD
ybereD
Reps: 104
When asking rigorous questions, I try to motivate my students and boost their confidence. For example, "you have the ability to answer this questions, I promise!" or "I am not telling you the answer, because I know this class has the knowledge to provide a thoughtful answer!" There have been times when I refuse to proceed in the lesson until students have answered the questions. Students have to be forced to think at times.
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Solution 11
Posted October 18, 2015 11:55 pm

eJeSaX
eJeSaX
Reps: 76
I teach SS and deeper thinking is a critical skill here. I always ask students to think about the who, what, when, where, how? Graphic organizers and concept maps are also a great help here.
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