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Case
Posted on March 15, 2015 12:41 am
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Jennifer Dowdy
Jennifer Dowdy
Reps: 101
Teacher's Kid
You have student in your class whose mother is a teacher in your school system. This student is very difficult in class and refuses to do any work. The student has the attitude that because his mother is a teacher, he is going to pass no matter what. His mother frequently comes to the school for meetings with her child's teachers asking them to do whatever they can to help him. You continue to offer help as far as tutoring, offering to take late assignments, extra credit assignments, yet the student continues to just do the minimum. The student brings his grade up to almost passing, by the end of the semester. On one of the last days of school, you ask students to write a reflection about the class, this student writes that he didn't do anything in the class all semester, and knew he was going to pass regardless because its always been that way for him. Do you give him the grade he earned, or give him that extra point or two to pass him along to avoid conflict?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 12:54 am

myqydy
myqydy
Reps: 102
This case is so crazy to me! Of course you would give the student the grade that the earned. Hopefully throughout the year you have kept wonderful records that support the grade you have given. You are not doing the student or their parents a favor by pushing them along. At some point, they will be a student in a school where their parent is not a teacher and they will not be given any favors. Until then, there attitude is preventing them from learning the content they need to. Our job is too important to just pass kids through.
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eZuGeQ
eZuGeQ
Reps: 200
I think that the student deserves the grade he earns, I think his mother of all people should understand that.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 4:04 am

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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 3:08 pm

dyTuDu
dyTuDu
Reps: 103
I have encountered this situation several times, and the advise that I would give is to make sure that your administrators are aware of the situation. Save emails, and record all conversations with the parent and provide these to your administrator. If your administration supports you and is aware of the situation, it is much easier to do the right thing, which in my opinion is to give the student the grade he or she has earned.
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eZuGeQ
eZuGeQ
Reps: 200
Great solution!
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 4:05 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 16, 2015 2:42 pm

jyteXa
jyteXa
Reps: 105
Don't "give" him anything. He has to earn it. Giving and giving and not making students work for it is what is wrong with our world today. People expect handouts instead of earning what they have. I see it at school all the time. I hope my son never gets that attitude about school. He would definitely have another thing coming if he did. That teacher needs to stress the importance of performing well at school and actually putting forth effort to earn good grades. I would have a very long heart to heart with the parent about their child's mentality.
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Solution 4
Posted March 15, 2015 1:47 am

tubyzy
tubyzy
Reps: 106
This is a very sticky situation--I have taught several teacher's kids. However, because you have been in contact all semester with the parent, and they know what he did and did not do. Since you have the documentation, the grade that he earned should be the one on the report card. If you would not bump other students' grades at the end of the semester, you cannot bump this one either.
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Solution 5
Posted March 15, 2015 1:48 am

tubyzy
tubyzy
Reps: 106
This is a very sticky situation--I have taught several teacher's kids. However, because you have been in contact all semester with the parent, and they know what he did and did not do. Since you have the documentation, the grade that he earned should be the one on the report card. If you would not bump other students' grades at the end of the semester, you cannot bump this one either.
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Solution 6
Posted March 15, 2015 1:40 pm

Kristin Doyon
Kristin Doyon
Reps: 108
The student's parent is enabling him; unfortunately, this student will not be successful until he learns that his mother cannot save him. The student should obviously get the grade that he earned-- by doing this, the student and the parent will learn that grades in your class are received by merit and hard work, not by bargains. Be sure to keep all documentation. This includes: student progress reports, copies of student work, parent contact (date, time, content, medium of contact), counselor contact, and administrator contact. If the student's parent is unhappy with their child's grade and they request a meeting, you should request that the counselor and/or administrator is present. You should present all of the documentation to prove that you have done everything in your power to ensure that the student is successful. There has to be an element of choice and motivation on the student's part. If the parent is still unsatisfied, I would present the written reflection to demonstrate the student's attitude. This would probably be your best form of documentation yet. It might not be a bad idea to include the student in the meeting as well.
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eRuPeT
eRuPeT
Reps: 103
I had a like situation come up this past year. An incident occurred where a child would not be allowed to go to an incentive activity, and the child's mom is a teacher in the same district. I received an email demanding an explanation, and I pretty much felt bullied into letting the child go. Very unfortunate.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 2:35 pm

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Solution 7
Posted March 15, 2015 7:37 pm

ugevyX
ugevyX
Reps: 101
It is important as soon as the teacher sees this problem developing to address it. It is the responsibility of the teacher to give the student what he or she earns. It is only hurting that student in the long run. If this situation arises again begin the first part of the year letting the student and parent know that they will have to earn the grade like everyone else.
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Solution 8
Posted March 7, 2016 4:16 am

useZyt
useZyt
Reps: 207
You should definitely give him the grade he earned and show the reflection to his mom and let his future teachers know of this problem.
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Solution 9
Posted October 9, 2017 1:44 am

Travis Cannon
Travis Cannon
Reps: 211
You have to give the student the grade he deserved! As a teacher, I'm sure his mother would understand. Also, as his mom being a teacher, you should have had a conference with her a long time ago.
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Solution 10
Posted October 4, 2015 2:50 pm

eDuMez
eDuMez
Reps: 100
I would have a meeting with the administration as well as the parent. This way everything will have a basis for documentation. During the meeting I would ask what the parent (teacher) would do if she was in the situation with a student in her class. It sounds like you are offering all the supports to help the child. This is a tough one. If you can post a follow up, I am curious how this gets handled in case I ever encounter this as a teacher.
Good luck
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