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Posted on March 15, 2015 1:23 am
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myqydy
myqydy
Reps: 102
Fluency will not improve
You teach second grade. Students are expected to read 100 words per minute by the end of the school year. You have one student who only reads 65 words per minute. She passes all comprehension measure and her reading is fluid even though it is slow. You have tried a few interventions but her fluency number will not improve. What do you do?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 1:47 pm

equLyV
equLyV
Reps: 104
Does this student recognize all 220 Dolch sight words? If not, I would practice sight word recognition and pre-primer words with the students to ensure they know how to read and use these words. Next, I would search for a passage or create a passage using all 220 sight words and write the total number of words at the end of each sentence in the passage for homework practice. Make sure the student has someone at home to count the words said fluently and subtract the words said incorrectly from the total. Finally, I would create a classroom center for this student to read a certain passage and have a higher level peer partner time the student, recording how many words that student read CORRECTLY in a minute. Have the peer partner report the words per minute to you. Tie a tangible prize or grade reward to the center for more motivation.
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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 2:18 pm

Kristin Doyon
Kristin Doyon
Reps: 108
One of the best possible solutions for upping reading fluency is through modeling. You could pair her up with a higher level learner as a peer tutor, and they can take turns reading to each other. You can ask her to stay after school, and you can model how to read with the appropriate pacing. You can take turns reading the same passage, where you read a page and she reads the same page as she matches your fluency. If you have stations set up in your room, you might want to find audio books for her to listen to as she reads along. The good news is that she does not lack in comprehension-- she may just need more modeling and more practice.
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Solution 3
Posted October 4, 2015 10:41 pm

QeJupa
QeJupa
Reps: 104
Have her do rereads, where she rereads the same book or passage. This will help her reading speed
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Solution 4
Posted March 15, 2015 3:43 am

zygudy
zygudy
Reps: 130
Try giving her some practice she can do at home. You may also want to speak with her parents about this and see if they may be able to be of some help or support by working with her at home.
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Solution 5
Posted March 16, 2015 2:51 am

uLubet
uLubet
Reps: 104
My daughter is close to this situation. She has excellent comprehension but because of her speech she could not pronounce many words. This was effecting her fluency. She is much better now. However, she has to play catch up with some words she was not able to sound out in first grade. It will take the speech therapist, me, and the teacher to assist with reinforcement. Encouragement by her peers in the classroom and at home is very important. My daughter was hesitant to read aloud because she did not like how she sounded in comparison with others.
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Solution 6
Posted October 14, 2015 6:04 pm

aHeRaJ
aHeRaJ
Reps: 128
Is it an absolute requirement in your school/county? The rate at which students read do not make them effective readers. When a student comprehends and can extend what he or she reads, then they have become an effective reader. Fluency is something that comes along naturally with practice. It does not improve comprehension though. I would just have her practice more passages on her level. It sounds like she is being successful though in reading.
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