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Posted on March 15, 2015 2:48 am
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ymuTyZ
ymuTyZ
Reps: 102
Talkative Class
I have a very talkative class! At the beginning of the year, this issue was manageable. Now it has become impossible to manage. My students know the consequences but they do not care. I have tried separating students but that still does not work. This issues is interfering with instructional time and it has to stop! What should I do?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 3:56 am

zygudy
zygudy
Reps: 130
First, make sure that you are giving appropriate consequences for inappropriate behavior. Next, try to find a reward system that works for the talkative students. Find out what motivates them, rewards, candy, approval, etc., and make sure to make an effort to catch them doing what they are supposed to be doing and reward them for it. Using rewards along with consequences may be what they need.
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ybereD
ybereD
Reps: 104
I have experienced similar issues with my kids. I handled this matter by implementing a competition based game into each instructional day. I picked out the one most important privilege my students had and told them it had been revoked. Furthermore, they would have to earn it back by beating the teacher for five consecutive classroom days. Hence, I kept a tally of points on the board: teacher vs students. Students earned points by complying with teacher directives and lost points when they did not comply.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 1:43 pm

ymuTyZ
ymuTyZ
Reps: 102
I will consider more rewards.
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 4:23 pm

eSyTyt
eSyTyt
Reps: 101
Rewards are always great for younger kids because it pushes them to do well.
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 2:14 am

rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
Exactly. Find what discourages/motivates the students.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:45 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 4, 2015 2:36 am

aPazat
aPazat
Reps: 102
The best way to stop negative behavior is to reward good behavior. When the class should be quiet and students are talking, acknowledge the kids that are not talking. Say something like, "I like how Katie is working quietly." The younger students will want to conform and it will be a gentle reminder for the older students.
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Solution 3
Posted March 15, 2015 2:50 pm

eRuPeT
eRuPeT
Reps: 103
I had a class like this and I had to become the "mean teacher" and enforce consequences. They did not like me for about a week but after that it became better. I had quite a few tears because students felt that I was being unfair, but talking is talking and I had told them the rules from the get-go. It is hard to reel them back in.
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ymuTyZ
ymuTyZ
Reps: 102
This is something I will consider trying. Thank you!
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 4:24 pm

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Solution 4
Posted March 15, 2015 7:50 pm

ugevyX
ugevyX
Reps: 101
I teach kindergarten and I had also have a talkative class. They have recently begun talking more. Several months ago I began using a behavior chain. I write the numbers one, two and three on the board. If the students keep at least one of the numbers on the board they get a link added to their chain. We are almost to the floor now and when they reach the floor I have promised them a snack party. This really helps when I can't pin point which student is misbehaving the most or if it is a majority of the students who causing a disturbance.
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ymuTyZ
ymuTyZ
Reps: 102
Thank you!
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 9:32 pm

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Solution 5
Posted October 13, 2015 3:36 am

anaRyn
anaRyn
Reps: 85
I would recommend playing classical music as they enter the classroom and have a quiet warm-up on the board or projector screen for them to start everyday as they enter your classroom. Practice this procedure and have it written on a poster on the wall as they come in everyday. This procedure should help them have a transition to your lesson and re-focus their energy by calming down. Having procedures and establishing daily routines is very important with noisy classrooms, because once they follow the procedures, routines, and rules, having group activities, peer activities, competition where the students can socialize as they learn, will assist them with using their communications skills in an constructive manner, and help you with being able to teach a class that enjoys communicating. Group work has helped me over the years with my talkative classes. I use their talkative skills to manage class discussions, and group work in a positive manner that is enjoyable for the students and for me.
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meXyHy
meXyHy
Reps: 158
I love this idea so much. If I were in this situation, I would exactly do this.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 9:45 pm

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Solution 6
Posted March 15, 2015 10:48 pm

JuNuBy
JuNuBy
Reps: 101
In my classroom, I create agendas for each child at the beginning of the year and write in them daily regarding their behavior. Parents see the agenda each night and sign it. This is one way I am able to cut back on behavior such as talking or not following directions. While it does take some time to create the agendas each year, this has worked great for my room and I have had very few issues because students do not want me to write in their agenda about behavior.
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ymuTyZ
ymuTyZ
Reps: 102
Thank you
  Posted on: March 15, 2015 11:53 pm

rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
The agenda idea is right on.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:45 am

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Solution 7
Posted February 24, 2018 4:00 am

Ariel Brangers
Ariel Brangers
Reps: 102
In the class I observe, the teacher has a reward system that if you have so many points you can participate in fun Friday. This could be a way to have them behave. Reward students not talking during instruction and deduct points for the chatty Kathy's. The first fun Friday they sit out of, will be the last and they won't talk during instruction.
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Solution 8
Posted February 26, 2016 9:28 pm

taMaSe
taMaSe
Reps: 201
If I were you, I would figure out the main students who are causing the issues and have a conference with their parents. You said you tried enforcing consequences, but students do not care. Maybe think about Making participation points and give them a zero if they talk too loudly and too much that day. Also, try rewarding good behaviors that students display. Set in place a rewards system promising something like a trip to the treasure box or a pizza party with you on Friday.
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