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Posted on March 15, 2015 2:48 pm
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equLyV
equLyV
Reps: 104
Administration Refuses to Suspend
A second year teacher begins teaching at an elementary school that is a Needs Improvement school on the failing list, has a student body that qualifies for 100% free lunch, and has 70% of the students diagnosed as EBD, having a conduct disorder, and/or ADHD. In her particular class, she teaches an all-male class where some of her students skip class, curse at teachers and students, start fights daily, and even threatens authority at the school. There is barely any parental support or involvement. However, when these instances occur administration refuses to suspend or reprimand the students and sends them back to class with a mere "slap on the wrist". Administration claims that suspending students or giving harsh reprimands are ineffective. What are some coping strategies or solutions for this teacher when her administration is working against her and majority of the school has chaos on a daily basis?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 5:55 pm

qaqyvy
qaqyvy
Reps: 135
In classes of this nature it is best to establish rules and consequences for these students when being disruptive. Many times the administration does not want to handle these disruptions, so the teacher needs to establish her own. Also, with classes like this they need no down time. Make sure all lessons keep the kids engaged and involved and allow little time or opportunities for disruptions. The teacher could also talk to the administration about some of the situations and see what they suggest that she do in bad disruptions. If suspension doesn't work then what do they suggest?
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yJuhuv
yJuhuv
Reps: 100
If I were in this situation, I would exactly do this.
  Posted on: October 14, 2018 10:52 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 4, 2015 2:15 am

uZyvaP
uZyvaP
Reps: 204
I tend to agree with not suspending students; it solves nothing and the student loses important instructional time, and some will actually get into trouble just to get out of going to school.. The students may then be out in the streets getting into even more deviant behavior. Most times, this is to cover up for not being able to do the school work.. That being said, I prefer some type of in-school suspension where the problem students can be removed from class, yet still in school where the can hopefully keep up with instruction.
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Solution 3
Posted March 15, 2015 4:52 pm

byMabu
byMabu
Reps: 101
If administration will allow it, come up with your own consequences for the child so that they are still held accountable for their actions.
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Solution 4
Posted March 16, 2015 12:56 am

ugevyX
ugevyX
Reps: 101
Remain calm. I have discovered this week that more upset I get the less control I have. Reward those who are behaving. Find consequences that will affect the students who are disruptive. Sometimes we place our young kindergarten students in other rooms. It helps them to be removed from the situation.
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Solution 5
Posted March 15, 2015 8:12 pm

yvyGyQ
yvyGyQ
Reps: 100
It is important that you gain a relationship with your team so that you can send students that need a change of environment for a short time period. If this problem continues you need to explain to administration that this behavior is hindering others from learning.
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Solution 6
Posted February 22, 2018 2:11 am

tuBaZu
tuBaZu
Reps: 200
EBD as stated is a disorder. We often forget to treat these students as such and refer to them as "bad kids". It is important to remember that every child is different and a blanket option for behavioral disorders is not going to be efficient. Many students labeled EBD, knows what EBD, means. They are aware of their disorder. ASK THEM. ASK the student what they need and what they think they deserve. A behavioral plan can be written like an IEP and with specific consequences, routines, and plans it will be easier to hold a student responsible and be structured. Suspending EBD students is the same as telling a blind student that its their fault they can't read.
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Solution 7
Posted March 16, 2015 2:43 am

ebenuD
ebenuD
Reps: 100
I love some of the other suggestions, but also agree that it is more than reasonable to ask the administration that you should do if they don't want to suspend them. In fact, ask them to come show you. Ask them to be a "guest speaker" in your class one day and have them show you how they think you should handle these situations.
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