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Posted on March 15, 2015 5:13 pm
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QeRary
QeRary
Reps: 101
ESOL test review
I have two non-English speaking students that are struggling in my class. They recieve ESOL support once a day. I am worried about how to help them review for the upcoming GaMass test. They have a spanish to english dictionary, I use google translate with them, and have made vocabulary cards for them in English and Spanish. I am not sure how to give them extra support for reviewing. Any suggestions?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 5:37 pm

eQymyX
eQymyX
Reps: 108
I would suggest talking to the students' ESOL teacher. I am sure that he/she could give you many great and useful ideas that could benefit your students. ESOL teachers are trained to work with these students, so I would utilize their skills as much as possible.
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Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:39 pm

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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 5:36 pm

Haley
Haley
Reps: 104
There are programs available through Google called Natural Reader, which reads passages to students at a natural rate and allows students to stop and go back to unknown words. I believe that you can select the passages and even add questions to the end for students to answer. There is also a program call RazKids, it may be too young for your age group, but it is another read and respond type program (you do have to have a license). Maybe suggest to parents they stay after school or stay in from any activity period they may have. This will be more work for you but hopefully it will help in the long run.
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Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:39 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 4, 2015 10:28 pm

QeJupa
QeJupa
Reps: 104
Talk tot he bilingual assistant for more helpful ideas that you can implement
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Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:39 pm

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Solution 4
Posted October 3, 2017 11:25 am

pyGyga
pyGyga
Reps: 205
You sound like you are using some great strategies! Do the students have IEPs for language? Check those for accommodations. After speaking with the ESOL teacher or bilingual assistant for more possible solutions, I would provide more visual aids, like graphic organizers.

Best of luck!
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Solution 5
Posted October 8, 2017 8:54 pm

Maritza
Maritza
Reps: 201
The first step would be to give the students test and allow them to do the tests by themselves to gather data about how their language is affecting their learning. After you do that, you should hold an emergency meeting with the ELL committee to find a way to provide additional support for the students.
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