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Posted on March 15, 2015 8:25 pm
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Xunezu
Xunezu
Reps: 107
Student Handwriting
With the increased rigor in our Kindergarten standards, there just doesn't seem to be time to explicitly teach our students how to correctly form letters and numbers. As students progress through the grade levels, I often hear complaints that their handwriting is atrocious. Is the explicit teaching of handwriting important, even if it isn't a standard? If so, when do you teach it, and with what resources?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 10:45 pm

uPaSeW
uPaSeW
Reps: 209
Handwriting is one of the basic and key elements of education. If a teacher cannot understand what a student has written, they cannot assess them. I would teach handwriting every day even if it is only ten to fifteen minutes a day. I would have students trace letters and numbers for homework and during the school day.
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VeHyge
VeHyge
Reps: 229
Yes! Completely agree, handwriting is actually going away. Having the students do it everyday (15 minutes) and practicing it without them realizing it is great.
  Posted on: October 1, 2015 2:56 pm

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Solution 2
Posted March 16, 2015 12:49 am

J SJ
J SJ
Reps: 101
I hear what you are saying and I believe it is super important to continue to teach handwriting. I teach first grade and we use a series called Handwriting without Tears. This is a good series. Handwriting should be taught in Kindergarten, first and into second grades. In third grade,the students learn cursive. It is such a foundational skill, yet we are expecting the students to pick it up naturally without any guidance. We should take the time at the beginning of the year to teach the correct letter formation, then we practice all year.
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meXyHy
meXyHy
Reps: 158
If I were in this situation, I would exactly do this. This is a great idea!
  Posted on: October 14, 2015 1:26 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 1, 2015 6:43 pm

Sutede
Sutede
Reps: 101
Students at this level should have a daily writing block which includes journal writing and that is where the continued practice on legibility should come into play. Prepare an easy to follow rubric that includes items such as correct punctuation, spelling of sight words, and good handwriting skills. The students can self-assess whether they have met all criteria. Make it fun!
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Solution 4
Posted March 16, 2015 1:58 am

aheGeG
aheGeG
Reps: 113
It could be part of the daily routine as part of the standards that have to be taught. See if you can find time to work it in as part of your routine first thing in the morning and after taking a look at who many need direct instruction in this area create an activity to do with this group while others are tackling centers or a little down time. Even five minutes a day could help.
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I agree students can practice handwriting as morning work, they still need to know how to write legibly.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 3:51 pm

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Solution 5
Posted March 16, 2015 2:17 am

uLubet
uLubet
Reps: 104
I feel as a parent of small children it is important to teach handwriting. As a high school teacher, there is a variety of handwriting that is good and bad. You can tell the students that put forth effort in writing in previous years. If you are able to incorporate technology in the classroom, there are some great apps that assist with handwriting. This would make it fun! It could be incorporated into a center in your classroom. You could also encourage parents who have a child specifically those in need of practice use the app or website at home. If no computer access, allow the student to trace sheets for practice at home.

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Solution 6
Posted March 17, 2015 5:24 am

HaXeSy
HaXeSy
Reps: 100
As Georgia Milestones is quickly approaching and students will be assessed with constructed responses, it is very important to explicitly teach handwriting. A great time to incorporate this in your classroom would be during your small group instruction. If you have students write a sentence, giving immediate feedback will let students know what to work on. You may also consider sending home additional handwriting homework for students who need that support.
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Solution 7
Posted October 11, 2015 5:17 am

deRudu
deRudu
Reps: 82
Handwriting is incredibly important. As a middle school teacher, I am seriously shocked when I cannot read a student's papers. I know cursive writing isn't in the standards anymore, but printing MUST be taught. These children cannot properly form their letter, and they do not use capital letters. They lack even the most basic handwriting skills. This is something they will need for their entire life, so it is paramount that we teach it. I understand kindergarten has a lot of standards, but they higher the grade, the more standards we teach. There will never be more time to teach and learn this vital skill than kindergarten.
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Solution 8
Posted October 11, 2015 5:26 pm

dubaNu
dubaNu
Reps: 190
I think in this type of situation, homework is necessary. Even if the children don't get as much help at home from their parents, they are able to complete something such as practicing writing their letters on their own.
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Solution 9
Posted March 16, 2015 12:43 am

udapum
udapum
Reps: 102
I would focus on this on a case by case basis with students. Some of them will not need direct instruction on handwriting while others might need the additional practice. Handwriting practice could be given to those individual students to complete at home as they probably will not need much assistance with it, just time to practice.
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Solution 10
Posted October 18, 2015 11:28 pm

Shelby Milton
Shelby Milton
Reps: 82
As a 6th grade teacher, it is very obvious when students are clearly taught how to write their letters and when they aren't. Even in 6th grade I have students who handwriting I cannot read at all. I am constantly asking them what they wrote in order for me to grade their work. PLEASE teach the students handwriting skills!!!
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Solution 11
Posted October 4, 2015 10:21 pm

QeJupa
QeJupa
Reps: 104
You could teach handwriting and how to form letters on white boards, pick a couple letters to focus on at a time
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I don't think the white boards give the students the proper proportions for writing. Lined paper is still the best bet.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 3:54 pm

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Solution 12
Posted March 7, 2016 4:36 am

beSade
beSade
Reps: 104
I would take maybe 10-15 minutes of class to teach students how to write. I would print out pieces of paper and have the students trace the letter numerous times until they know the flow and are able to write it by themselves. I would also have them say what letter it is while writing the letters out.
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Solution 13
Posted October 9, 2016 9:30 pm

qyryMa
qyryMa
Reps: 203
It is important. Them understanding even the very basics such as writing is crucial. I would correct as you go. If you see a misspelled word or you can't comprehend it i would note the paper. Let them know the expectations.
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Solution 14
Posted October 3, 2017 11:56 am

pyGyga
pyGyga
Reps: 205
Some students have poor fine motor skills, which affects their handwriting. Technology is a huge part of the progressive classroom, so if students experience difficulty with poor penmanship, they can type on the classroom computer.

Best of luck!
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