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Posted on March 15, 2015 8:48 pm
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JuNuBy
JuNuBy
Reps: 101
Cooperative Groups and Uncooperative Students
I have a student with autism who comes into my classroom for social studies and science each day. He has a very difficult time working with others and getting along. If he loses at something or someone does something better than him, he has a meltdown. This has made it very difficult to do any group work in social studies and science. What are some solutions to help him better get along with his peers and able to work in cooperative groups?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 15, 2015 9:07 pm

uPaSeW
uPaSeW
Reps: 209
I also have an autistic student in my classroom and have worked with autistic children for two years now. The first thing that I would recommend you to do this for this student is to work in the group with them at least one time. By working in the group with them, you can model positive behavior and correct negative behaviors that the student is doing. I would then give the student some type of positive reinforcement to motivate them to want to work well with the other members of the group. For example, you can give computer time or extended time doing something that the student likes to do to positively reinforce them.
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Solution 2
Posted March 15, 2015 9:54 pm

ugevyX
ugevyX
Reps: 101
I would suggest letting this students group be smaller. It could be him and just one other student. Once he was able to work with that student then add to his group. Reward positive behavior and those times he does work well with his group. Hopefully he will be his skills at working with others. Lastly set up ground rules for the groups that help correct any minor problems that may occur. I would also not assigned work that will cause him to feel that someone else does better. Let it be a team effort.
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Solution 3
Posted October 3, 2015 2:02 pm

Tamupy
Tamupy
Reps: 100
I would incorporate affective lessons that help to develop social skills. The affective lesson can be incorporated into the social studies and science lessons. A lesson could focus on one social skill at at time until the student with autism has mastered the skill. Collaborate with the students other teachers so that he is receiving the affective lesson in each subject and is allowed to work on the social skill throughout the day.
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Solution 4
Posted September 29, 2015 12:20 am

WuGusa
WuGusa
Reps: 100
I would continue to put the student in groups but monitor the student and make sure that he handles situation the right way by redirecting his behavior instead of having him look at it as losing make it have a positive light and make the student feel like they are not losing anything.
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Solution 5
Posted February 24, 2016 11:50 pm

Jen
Jen
Reps: 225
One thing I would always make sure this student has it a session prior to cooperative learning with an aid about what his/her job in a group is and why it is important it is. This might make the transition into cooperative learning smoother. I would also try to make his group small, two additional people in the group tops. Our job as teachers is to help all students develop in all areas.
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Solution 6
Posted October 7, 2017 2:55 pm

DebaDy
DebaDy
Reps: 100
First of all it is important to remember that students with autism have issues with social interaction and are often times very introverted, it is the nature of the disability. To begin I would work one on one with the student while the rest of the class is working in groups, reinforcing positive behaviors and working through negative behaviors. If the student needs time alone do not push him/her to keep working with you or a partner because this will only continue the anxiety of working with someone else. As the student becomes comfortable working with you, introduce him/her to a student that will work well with the autistic student. Gradual release can be very beneficial in cases like this. Stay positive and be patient.
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