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Posted on March 16, 2015 1:43 am
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ebenuD
ebenuD
Reps: 100
Student needs immediate attention
I have a student that requires a lot of attention and if I do not address her needs immediately she will get mad and tell me she doesn't need my help. The other day she snapped at me to get my attention and then got mad when I told her that was not an appropriate way to get my attention. I spend large amounts of time during class working with this student and when she does come to tutoring after school I always make time to answer her questions. Yet she goes home and tells her mom I don't want to help her. How do I address her needs without neglecting my other students and how do I help her understand I can't always be immediately available?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 1, 2015 11:08 pm

Holly Ebbert
Holly Ebbert
Reps: 225
In this case having a parent teacher conference would be beneficial. It would be great if you had feedback from the parent as to why she may need so much attention. I believe it would benefit the student, teacher, and classroom if positive reinforcements were set up during class for this student. When it is not the appropriate time the teacher can have a code word for the student to remind he instruction is almost done and you'll be there to assist after instruction time. I would also log how many time during instruction time it is happening to discuss other ways if this doesn't work. Parental involvement will be a great help of it is available.
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meXyHy
meXyHy
Reps: 158
if I were in this situation, I would also have a parent student meeting to clear things up in front of the parents.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 8:17 pm

ymuXyg
ymuXyg
Reps: 100
A parent-teacher conference will be beneficial here, I agree. Great advice.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 6:46 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 11, 2015 7:46 pm

uzyHeJ
uzyHeJ
Reps: 100
I would keep extensive documentation of her behavior. I would also determine what is "setting her off" with an ABC Chart (antecedent, behavior, consequence). Talk with the parent and get their input on what to do, what helps her, and what they do at home. After all of that, I would set up a positive behavior intervention plan that rewards the positive behaviors and extinguishes the negative behaviors. Focus on one or two at a time and involve the student. Talk with her about her behaviors and how it's distracting others (a social story is great in this situation) and what appropriate behavior looks like. Have her help you in creating an action plan; what the behaviors look like, how often to be rewarded, what the consequences and rewards will be, etc. Put it in place, keep at it for a few weeks, continue to take data, and know that it's going to get worse before it gets better, but it will get better.
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
Maybe just a different method is needed, she might do very well in small group situation. I would try this first, before all the paperwork.
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 9:30 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 4, 2015 11:34 pm

eDuMez
eDuMez
Reps: 100
It sounds like this student is used to receiving immediate attention from her parents at home (and if she does not get yours she throws a fit) or she is getting too little attention at home and is in desperate need of your attention. I would call her parents and ask if she acts like that at home. If so, what steps do the parents take in handling the situation. Either way calling home lets the parents know that you ARE concerned, and not trying to ignore their child.
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uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I agree, the parents should know you are concerned with her behavior.
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 9:31 pm

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Solution 4
Posted July 11, 2016 3:11 am

yGapeW
yGapeW
Reps: 101
If the student is having that much trouble she may need to be tested. It is important to try and build a relationship so that she is comfortable.
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Solution 5
Posted October 2, 2015 2:56 pm

uWaQyr
uWaQyr
Reps: 100
Hold a parent, student, teacher conference. Write down times and dates and how long you have worked with the student to show the parent that that information is false. At the same conference explain to the student that she is disrupting others from learning when she does that. Explain that maybe another student may have the same issue and you can help her classmates at the same time. Involve her with instruction and other students issues to try and "kill two birds with one stone."
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Solution 6
Posted March 7, 2016 12:41 am

Hunabu
Hunabu
Reps: 100
I would first see if there was any way she could see the school counselor, they are equipped with solutions and helping students communicate their needs.
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