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Posted on October 12, 2015 11:24 pm
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aReByT
aReByT
Reps: 77
Disrespectful Student
I have a Kindergarten student who is extremely disrespectful and rude. He talks back to teachers, makes snide remarks to other students such as "Duh, I already knew that", he tells me "I don't want to do this", he told the parapro after having to move his clip to red (loss of recess) "That's why I don't like you". He smacks his lips when having to move his clip because of misbehavior. He slams his clip on the behavior chart when he does move it. I have tried consequences such as loss of recess, silent lunch, and timeout another teacher's classroom. His desk is in the far back corner of the classroom as well. I have been in contact with his mother almost on a daily basis about his behavior. I have also had the principal have a chat with him. Nothing seems to be working. What else can I do?!?!?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 14, 2015 1:42 am

uTaMaW
uTaMaW
Reps: 78
I have seen two possible solutions to disrespectful students work on numerous occasions. The first solution is to find out what the student is interested in and make connections to that topic. Sometimes it is a particular sports team or a type of music. Asking the student specific questions about their interests can build trust and relationship. The second solution to a disrespectful learner is to “kill them with kindness”. Never let the student know that they are getting under your skin, but respond with “I am sorry you feel that way”. Avoid sarcasm in your positive response because the goal is for the disrespectful student to realize that you are on their side and will not be deterred by a bad attitude.
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Solution 2
Posted October 13, 2015 12:42 am

uzyHeJ
uzyHeJ
Reps: 100
Social stories are useful in this situation to show him how his remarks come across and hurt others and then practice how to talk respectfully with others. Ignore the negative remarks, don't even acknowledge that he's said them, and praise the positive comments. Maybe you can set up a positive reinforcement plan to decrease negative comments and increase respectful ones. In an extreme case, repeating what the child does/says may be needed for the child to truly see how they behave and how it comes across to others. Sometimes they are unaware of how they behave and seeing it from others helps, but only in extreme cases.
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meXyHy
meXyHy
Reps: 158
This is a great solution, I would also use these steps.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 8:48 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 14, 2015 3:31 pm

aHeRaJ
aHeRaJ
Reps: 128
All of the solutions I read are good. You definitely want to praise all the positive you can. I would not reward positive behaviors with tangible treats but you could let him eat in the classroom with you each day. Get to know him. When a child likes his or her teacher, the misbehaviors start to diminish. I had a student like this. He was the most unlikeable kid ever! He called me all kinds of names and tried to pull the earrings out of my ears/climb out the window, etc. I found out that he played basketball and I showed up to his game one evening. After that, things started changing. I would let him eat lunch with me in the classroom and we would talk about basketball and all kinds of things. I found out that the reason he acted out so badly (other than the fact that he had mental disorders) was that he was severely embarrassed when he got in trouble or got something wrong. That was his coping technique. We made a deal and created nonverbal cues between us to use when he was misbehaving or for him to use when he wanted to raise his hand to look smart, but didn't really know the answer. I am not saying that he never misbehaved again, but it got so much better.
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ezyHes
ezyHes
Reps: 101
I like that you showed you cared about him by showing up to his game and eating lunch with him to show interest.
  Posted on: March 5, 2016 4:32 am

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Solution 4
Posted October 13, 2015 12:36 am

uhaBeJ
uhaBeJ
Reps: 76
I had a student in 2nd grade last year just like that. Nothing mattered to him. It was so frustrating. I brought him up in RTI and we decided to do a behavior sheet. He had 3 areas, follows directions, respects authority, respects peers. The day was broken into 10 time segments. Each segment and each area could be worth 2 points. If they do the specific behavior for the whole time, they earn 2 points. Part of the time, 1 point. Not at all, 0 points. At the end of the day, if they have met their "goal" points, they earn a treat. The trouble I had was when it was time to start taking away the treats his behaviors returned.
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Solution 5
Posted October 13, 2015 3:26 am

QejyHu
QejyHu
Reps: 100
Find every positive thing you can on this student and reward him or praise him for it. Ignore every negative attention seeking attitude that he gives and inform the class that as a class we will not reward negative behavior from anyone. We want to encourage positive behavior. If he sees he is not getting attention from it but is getting attention from the positive behavior, his behavior might change. I have students in high school that act the same way. It does work but consistency is the major key to making this work.
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Solution 6
Posted October 18, 2015 9:27 pm

VuGuGu
VuGuGu
Reps: 127
I have noticed that sometimes consequences do not affect some of the little ones. I have also noticed that they absolutely hate feeling that they have been left out, or feeling as if they are not part of a team. I would suggest rewarding those kids who are being respectful, and doing what they have been asked. If the rest of the class is receiving an incentive for their good behavior, this kid may begin to change his ways so that he is eligible for the rewards.
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Solution 7
Posted October 15, 2015 12:22 am

Thomas Smallwood
Thomas Smallwood
Reps: 82
I have tried to meet the students like this right where they are. For example just running into them in the hallway and saying hello, and letting to know them on a personal level. Sometimes this fixes the problem because the student sees you as a more personable adult rather than just a teacher.
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Solution 8
Posted October 4, 2016 10:13 pm

RyVeta
RyVeta
Reps: 106
talk!
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Solution 9
Posted October 9, 2016 12:50 am

uVupuz
uVupuz
Reps: 100
I would have a conference with the student and parents to create a positive behavior plan. The parents would be invited, an encouraged to give their support. There needs to be consequences at home too.
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Solution 10
Posted February 20, 2017 11:20 pm

Mynuqy
Mynuqy
Reps: 100
Move him to the front of the class and let him help you and show him when he does well. He will feel proud and can serve as a role model. the boy needs attention.
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Solution 11
Posted October 15, 2018 3:45 am

yHuDeV
yHuDeV
Reps: 86
More than likely that is a huge parenting issue. I would use positive reinforcement and ignore his behaviors.
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