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Posted on October 14, 2015 4:24 pm
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aHeRaJ
aHeRaJ
Reps: 128
Underachiever in a high achiever class
I have a gifted and high achiever class this year. Our county places gifted identified students in this class and uses a rubric to determine the high achievers that fill in the slots. In our school, we do not have many gifted students and even our high achievers are not true high achievers. I have a student who definitely should not be in this class. Out of all of the assignments we have had so far, he has done maybe 5% of them. I have already had 2 conferences with the parent. I have told her all of the expectations on this high achieving class before she signed the acceptance letter. I told her that her child was going to have to work very hard to be successful in this classroom and asked her if she still wanted him to stay in the class or be removed. She chose to have him stay in the class. He has not turned in the 2 last projects, does no homework, and virtually no classwork. The mom thinks I am being too hard on him because he is a 'sensitive' child but I feel like I should punish him and hold him to the same high standards as the other students. Am I wrong about this?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 15, 2015 1:07 pm

jonathan lindsey
jonathan lindsey
Reps: 78
It would actually be unfair to him and the other students to not hold him to the standards set forth in the class. If he chooses not to do the assignments, I would continue to contact mom, make sure you are keeping records, etc. Be careful not to put too much time and effort into his cause, because your responsibility in this class is to take your high achievers even further. Encourage him to do the work, but allow this student to fail if he chooses. Often , we learn more from our failures than our successes. Lowering your expectations for him, or any student, will never encourage them to learn and grow. It would actually reinforce a bad work ethic.
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Kady Schlemmer
Kady Schlemmer
Reps: 202
I agree that lowering your standards for this student would reinforce a poor work ethic. Keep pushing this student, and if need be, let him fail.
  Posted on: July 9, 2016 6:54 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 14, 2015 7:38 pm

uTaTub
uTaTub
Reps: 85
I think you are very justified in your response to the behavior. I would make sure that you are documenting all of the "lack" of progress, as well as the phone calls, conferences, and face to face meetings with the parents. I sometimes use a spiral binder to jot down a quick note to reference back to when keeping documentation logs on specific students such as this. Good luck!
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meXyHy
meXyHy
Reps: 158
I would document everything too so I could reference back. I would use this in the classroom.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 8:47 pm

eSyTyt
eSyTyt
Reps: 101
Great suggestion
  Posted on: October 16, 2015 3:00 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 15, 2015 9:25 pm

uTaMaW
uTaMaW
Reps: 78
The discription of this student does not remind me of a slower learner but an unmotivated one. Try and find out what motives this student. Make a personal connection with him and find out what his hopes and aspirations are for the future. I agree with the other posters that you should continue to hold him to the high standard that this particular class warrents, but do not give up on motivating him. If he gets nothing out of your class except a failing grade, at least you have tried to reach him while also demonstrating that there are repercussion for inactivity.
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Solution 4
Posted October 18, 2015 3:55 pm

eQynuv
eQynuv
Reps: 102
You are not wrong. The parents knew this was not going to be easy for the student when they signed him up for it. It may be time to let them know that this program is not for their child.
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Solution 5
Posted March 4, 2016 7:02 pm

pytaLy
pytaLy
Reps: 89
Try to give him higher level work to complete or make him a "teacher assistant"
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Solution 6
Posted October 7, 2016 1:51 am

Krystalynn Gulczewski
Krystalynn Gulczewski
Reps: 203
I think this is an issue more with how the students are placed I might talk to the school because at the rate this child is going he is going to fail the class. He might be smart but not want to do any of the work so i might just sit down with him AND his mother and explain what is going on and try and find a solution. The child might not want to be in the class and you have to do what is best for the student.
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Solution 7
Posted October 10, 2016 1:38 am

MePyJy
MePyJy
Reps: 205
You are totally correct in both contacting the parent and not lowering the standards for this kind of gifted program. But I also think you hit it on the head when you said unmotivated. Having experienced a similar situation it is better to see if the student is ready to leave. If he leaves and his motivation stays the same it is the students motivation and ethic at school not with the gifted program.If he goes back to regular classes and is shown again to at a gifted level talk to the parent about reassigning him in the gifted program but with a program suited for his kind of learning style.
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Solution 8
Posted October 4, 2016 2:25 pm

WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
How did the student do in the regular classroom? It seems like the student just is not doing the work, this does not make him a bad student or a low student. He could be the smartest kid in the class, just needs differentiated instruction. Try to engage him by completing the assignment orally or in a creative way. If he really does not understand the material, then can you as the teacher override the parent if he is failing?
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