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Posted on October 15, 2015 2:51 am
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uXyRyd
uXyRyd
Reps: 80
Late Lesson Plans
In my school, teachers share the responsibility of developing lesson plans; 1 subject per teacher and it rotates every week. There is a teacher on my grade-level whom FREQUENTLY submits her weekly lesson plans late. If the plans have to be submitted Wednesday, the team will not receive them until Sunday night or ever Monday morning. We have tried discussing this matter with her, not submitting our lesson plans to her for her to do her own, and even bringing this to the attention of administrators; none of which have worked. What do you suggest we as a team should do?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 15, 2015 5:48 pm

Mandy Beverly
Mandy Beverly
Reps: 78
I would try and have a team meeting with the administrators present, so that they can support you all. I would discuss with her the disadvantages of submitting the lesson plans late and let her know how important it is that you all receive them in a timely manner.
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meXyHy
meXyHy
Reps: 158
this is a good way to fix the situation.
  Posted on: October 15, 2015 9:19 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 16, 2015 8:31 pm

aTytyP
aTytyP
Reps: 81
Yes, I agree with not sharing your part with her. I would go ahead and tell her up front she will not be getting the ones you all make until she turns in her part. If she continues to not turn them in on time then just take her out of the equation all together, and you all rotate with the extra subject each week so that someone is still getting her subject lesson plans done. Then she is making her own lesson plans each week for every subject.
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Solution 3
Posted October 16, 2015 3:18 pm

jyteXa
jyteXa
Reps: 105
At this point, you have made an honest effort to help her. You can't beg someone to do their job. Lesson plans are kind of a big deal, we get an email at work if they are a few minutes late. The best advice I know to give you is to let her sink or swim. Do your part and do not share your hard work with her. She is an adult and should be responsible for her own actions. You can't be constantly held responsible for her shortcomings.
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Solution 4
Posted October 15, 2015 10:48 pm

Morgan Zwissler
Morgan Zwissler
Reps: 81
I would go back to the option of not submitting lesson plans to this teacher. I feel that the rest of the team is being disrespected by this teacher, and it's obvious that nothing you do will change his/her work ethic. I would discuss it with my team and let administration know that this teacher is out of the lesson plan rotation.
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uXyRyd
uXyRyd
Reps: 80
In this way, I feel as though the students are the ones who suffer the most. But you are right, nothing will change this person's work ethic.
  Posted on: October 17, 2015 1:39 am

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Solution 5
Posted October 7, 2016 6:54 pm

ybaHyp
ybaHyp
Reps: 200
I would meet with her to discuss why the lesson plans are late. Casually bring it up during the group meeting. Find out why, and discuss a solution with the teacher.
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Solution 6
Posted October 10, 2016 5:26 am

QaNese
QaNese
Reps: 102
I sounds like your teacher is careless. I would talk to the administration or team leader. They can either inform you how to handle this, or take care of it themselves.
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Solution 7
Posted October 10, 2016 5:27 am

QaNese
QaNese
Reps: 102
I sounds like your teacher is careless. I would talk to the administration or team leader. They can either inform you how to handle this, or take care of it themselves.
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Solution 8
Posted February 21, 2018 6:10 pm

nehury
nehury
Reps: 200
I would try to have a team meeting to brainstorm other ways that lesson plans can be made. Suggest team-planning or other strategies in order to get the plans done on time. Having administration present would help the team construct a plan that would be implemented. Ask administration to perform weekly check-ins with the teacher as well.
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Solution 9
Posted February 25, 2018 4:55 pm

eSaPaz
eSaPaz
Reps: 200
I would again discuss this with the teacher. Then i would again go to the administration and discuss it with them. If still nothing becomes of the situation then i would go to the people aboute my administration to atempt to solve the problem.
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