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Posted on October 15, 2015 5:52 pm
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Mandy Beverly
Mandy Beverly
Reps: 78
Worried Parents
I have received a few emails from parents concerning their children. The children that they are concerned about are the ones that are well behaved and have outstanding grades. I have high expectations for my students but I feel that the parents are being a bit over-bearing by being concerned about a 90% on a test. It is a wonderful thing that they are involved and expect perfect scores but I am struggling with how I am going to say, "your child is doing fine" without offending them. I feel that they will disagree with me and continue to worry.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 15, 2015 10:58 pm

urebyL
urebyL
Reps: 79
I have had several parents like the ones you describe. I suggest setting up a conference with the parent. Often times, emails are often hard to communicate tone. Prepare for the meeting by having student data readily available (grades, work samples, etc.).When the parent arrives to the meeting, greet them, and brief them on the data you have. Then, allow them to share their concerns. Take notes during the conference. Address their points of issue, giving evidence as you go. The conversation might go like this:

Parent: "I am concerned with my child's grades being so close to Bs. Johnny is capable of much higher and I do not accept Bs."
Teacher: ""Mrs. A, I can understand how a 90 concerns you, since Johnny is such a high achieving student. However, Johnny does very well in all areas and is such a joy to have in class. Johnny is successful and I don't want him to become bored. I'd like to keep Johnny challenged with content."
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ymuXyg
ymuXyg
Reps: 100
Setting a monthly conference might be a good way to keep them at bay.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 5:48 pm

 Ramos
Ramos
Reps: 100
Writing a quick note in the childs adgenda might ease the parents worry as well.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 4:48 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 15, 2015 11:57 pm

Morgan Zwissler
Morgan Zwissler
Reps: 81
I work at a school with the same type of parents. I agree that it is wonderful to have involved parents, but I worry that too much pressure is being placed on children. When parents contact me regarding grades, I give them honest answers. I'm not worried about offending them. If I have no concerns about the student, I tell them. If they want things to study, I suggest they read with the child from the textbook.
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Solution 3
Posted October 18, 2015 2:30 pm

HesuHy
HesuHy
Reps: 77
Some people are more apt to worrying no matter what. It is not necessarily a negative thing, however it is very little you can do to stop this worrying all together. I would suggest that if you tell the parents that the student did fine but did not receive a perfect score, if allowed, show the parent the rubric or expectations so that they will be able to see the areas that the student would have needed to cover in order to make 100%. So that along with them knowing the student is progressing normally, they are able to pinpoint areas that could be improved upon in their eyes. You could also have the children write in a journal of some sort to explain how they felt after lessons. This could open up conversation between parent and child.
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Solution 4
Posted October 18, 2015 2:41 pm

Sophy Shabana
Sophy Shabana
Reps: 100
I have also had the experience of working with parents who are overly worried about their high performing students. The first step would be to call them in for a face to face meeting in order to avoid a barrage of emails. The teacher can communicate to the parent that the student is performing extremely well in class and contributes enthusiastically. Once a positive rapport is established with the parent, the teacher can map out a course of action for assessment/ test preparation in terms of study guides being sent home etc. When the parent is more involved in the assessment preparation process they will be more understanding. Additionally, the teacher can also communicate the rubric that will be utilized to grade the assessment. If the parent appears to be dissatisfied with the grade even after the teacher attempting the above steps, the teacher can explain that it is important for the student to apply the content that is being mastered in class. A very useful application is the Explain Everything App, the student can be asked to work on this extension project both in school and at home. This enables the parent to see that the student is actually applying the content covered in class, which will help other students also understand the concept.
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Solution 5
Posted March 1, 2016 4:40 am

aryBaV
aryBaV
Reps: 125
Parents will always worry, in this case if a teacher is worried about a low A, I would let them know what the class average is, and how well there student is performing. Although they may have one standard share with them the objectives of the classroom and explain the student is meeting them, so there is nothing to worry about.
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Solution 6
Posted October 18, 2015 5:14 pm

qyQaGy
qyQaGy
Reps: 78
I had a very similar experience to yours this week during student led conferences in which parents asked me to explain their child's progress rather than listening to their child. Encourage parents to talk to their children about how they are being challenged in your class. If students are making 95-100 consistently they probably aren't being challenged and run the risk of becoming bored in class because they do not have to work as hard. I feel that what you have said to parents is appropriate and that to an extent some parents who worry will always find something to worry about. Keep contact with them to let them know what their child is doing well and how they can push them to exceed.
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Solution 7
Posted March 7, 2016 12:37 am

Hunabu
Hunabu
Reps: 100
I would address them and explain that their test score was above class average and you are thrilled with the results they are getting and explain how hard you see them working both in class but at home with their homework.
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Solution 8
Posted July 11, 2016 2:54 am

yGapeW
yGapeW
Reps: 101
I think it is a great idea to have a face-to-face meeting with both of the parents if possible. That way, one can reinforce the other. Express your thoughts on the child's performance.
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