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Posted on October 16, 2015 12:39 am
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urebyL
urebyL
Reps: 79
Least Restrictive Environment
I have a new student to my 4th grade classroom. He has autism and while I have had students with autism in the mainstream classroom in previous years, I have never had a student this severe. The student had a one on one parapro at the school he attended prior to my school. I am very concerned, because I teach the inclusion class this year and I have a high number of ADHD students. Since this student requires so much support, my inclusion students are not receiving the services required by their IEP when the inclusion teacher comes to our classroom for the included segments. In my opinion, these other students are in their least restrictive environments because they are successful with the services, accommodations, and modifications they receive. However, my new student takes away from these services. He is very distracting to others and distracted himself. I do not feel that he is benefiting from the services, and the other students are missing out. What are the next steps to show that the student needs another placement without insulting the SPED teacher and seeming to tell her how to do her job appropriately? What actions should be taken without tattle tailing that my students with IEPs are not being served because of the attention one student requires?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 18, 2015 2:29 pm

SaSyJe
SaSyJe
Reps: 107
I actually was in a similar situation two years ago. All four academic teachers that this student visited went together to speak to administration and with the SPED coordinator. This happened within the first two weeks of school! We were required to document EVERY LITTLE DETAIL to prove that the one student required so much attention that the other students with IEPS where not receiving the services. They also had an informal survey to ask the students general questions about being in a safe environment or if learning was taking place. We had to keep documentation for an entire 9-week period. Our SPED coordinator also researched things that we could do as warnings for the student if she became a distraction. I must say that it was extremely frustrating, but it did work for the better benefit of everyone.
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Kady Schlemmer
Kady Schlemmer
Reps: 202
Wow. That sounds like it took a lot of effort and commitment. I bet your students were thankful that you worked it out for the better of everyone involved!
  Posted on: July 9, 2016 7:04 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 18, 2015 11:49 pm

aXyheN
aXyheN
Reps: 114
This student would probably be best serviced in a resource room where there are no more than five to seven students opposed to an inclusion settiing. If I were in this situation, I would invite the SPED director into the room to observe the student that requiring all the attention as well as note the students who are not receiving services. In addition, I would document a day where the inclusion teacher actually assisted students receiving services and recorded their grades to compare their grades to the days where they do not receive assistance due to this one disruptive child.
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Solution 3
Posted October 16, 2015 5:59 pm

aQaWus
aQaWus
Reps: 131
I would keep a log of behavior of the student and how the services are not helping. If the log has sufficient evidence the SPED teacher should see this new student needs to be put into another classroom. Using the log makes it so you would not have to mention your other students.
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Solution 4
Posted October 6, 2016 6:21 pm

PuWupe
PuWupe
Reps: 206
I will suggest to have a meeting with everyone involve in this, they are all adults and their concern should be the students being successful and not think that a teacher is being rude by seeking help.
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Solution 5
Posted October 9, 2016 11:57 pm

yjeNus
yjeNus
Reps: 202
I am experiencing a similar situation in my internship right now. We recently got a new student is severely low functioning. At his previous school he had a one on one parapro but now he does not. It has caused issues in the classroom because the other students are not getting all of the accommodations and modifications and one on one that they need in order to be successful because the new student requires so much of the teachers time. Documentation of the incidents are key. Any and all forms would be acceptable; anecdotal records, checklists, and even student artifacts and portfolios documenting student work prior to the new student and student work after the new student. This will allow you to talk with the SPED teacher and allow he or she to better understand your struggle.
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Solution 6
Posted October 9, 2016 1:04 am

uVupuz
uVupuz
Reps: 100
Document, document, and document. I would also contact the parents to see if they support you or not. They might have some strategies that can help you. Give the student some social books. This might help them see how their actions impact others.
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Solution 7
Posted February 26, 2017 4:54 pm

tygaBu
tygaBu
Reps: 201
I believe that using a combination of teacher and aid documentation as well as having someone from the research room observe the student to see if they would be a fit for the program would be best. The SPED teacher should also be brought in on the process and observe if at all possible.
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Solution 8
Posted March 4, 2016 7:01 pm

pytaLy
pytaLy
Reps: 89
This could work
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