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Posted on October 16, 2015 4:04 pm
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JezaHa
JezaHa
Reps: 101
Teaching "Teacher Kids"
Working as a teacher presents us with a task like no other. We have to deal with, not only our students, but their parents as well. Oftentimes, for me, I have great communication skills with my parents. I take the time to give them what they need, and they feel comfortable reaching out to me. The only time this gets cumbersome is when I teach a teachers kid, or teaching a child of a staff member in the building. How do I establish boundaries with these parents? Should I approach them differently than other parents? How do I separate school from a possible outside friendship?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 16, 2015 6:19 pm

aQaWus
aQaWus
Reps: 131
you should establish that all teachers have their own way of teaching. you shouldn't approach them any differently because they are still a parent of your student. They do know how teaching is and should understand not to cross that professional line. you have to set the boundary that what happens at school does not affect the friendship.
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ymuXyg
ymuXyg
Reps: 100
Setting boundaries is important. Great solution.
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 5:46 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 18, 2015 12:59 am

aXyheN
aXyheN
Reps: 114
Boundaries are established at the beginning of any task. As soon as you find out this student is in your class you should put forth a conscious effort to make sure no favoritism is shown under any circumstances. These parents should be approached differently because you work in the same building as the parent. If the parent randomly wants to meet to discuss their child, do not allow them to do so in the hallway or walking out to the car. Be sure these parents call or email to schedule a parent conference just like you would with any other parent.
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Solution 3
Posted October 18, 2015 3:34 am

vaHame
vaHame
Reps: 76
I teach a teacher's child now, and have taught several in the past. I find it to be a plus that these parents were so accessible to my classroom. I utilized that in any way I could to better communicate with the parent. If they stopped me in the hall to talk, I would tell them I would stop by afterschool or to stop by my room. I have also taught lifelong friends children. This too put me in a good position with these parents. Yes, they called me at home about homework. Although, it didn't bother me at all. Finding ways to make the best of the situation is vital. As a parent, I think about these same issues each time I pass my daughter's class in the hallway. I don't ask her teacher is she doing okay, I wait and talk to her in private.
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Solution 4
Posted October 18, 2015 2:45 pm

HesuHy
HesuHy
Reps: 77
I would established boundaries, to include protocol, routine,etc as soon class begins. If the school has procedures for parents, then I would expect that the "teacher/staff" students follow those same rules in regards to your classroom. The biggest thing is that communication so that these big deals are not left assumed. Also, as the teacher I would be sure to follow these procedures as well (i.e, not letting the student wander or sending the student to the parents room when misbehaving, etc). Let all the parents know that they are apart of the classroom community, but that you are ultimately responsible for all results and all students.
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Solution 5
Posted October 18, 2015 5:17 pm

qyQaGy
qyQaGy
Reps: 78
If you start to feel that there is a problem, address it with the parents as soon as you can so that it does not grow into a larger problem. As long as you carry yourself professionally you shouldn't have any big problems. You can always tell the parent your concern and ask them "How can we make sure that there is a difference between us as friends/coworkers and me as your child's teacher?" Communicating your concerns will work out better than worrying. Good luck!
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Solution 6
Posted February 28, 2016 2:00 am

yDaTes
yDaTes
Reps: 126
Our school ask us to ask the parents what is the best form of communication. (i.e. email, phone call, conference)
Then we are asked to not comment to our fellow faculty member, both positive or negative, throughout the work day. We must reach out to the parents like we would to any other parents.
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Solution 7
Posted October 22, 2015 4:29 pm

PysaHe
PysaHe
Reps: 101
I have many communication tools that I use with parents. Some of them are digital, and allow parents to communicate with me outside of school hours and physical space. I try to set parameters with parents at open house or parent orientation. I think that setting clear boundaries from the beginning will prevent a lot of communication problems. Stop the conversation before it becomes detailed. Ask the parents to schedule a conference time at the school in order to talk about concerns.
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Solution 8
Posted March 1, 2016 4:45 am

aryBaV
aryBaV
Reps: 125
When you have a student that is a child of a staff member, they could be treated the same as a regular parent. They of course have an edge on the communication and participation but everything else should stay the same. If they are true professionals they will understand the boundaries lines.
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Solution 9
Posted October 9, 2016 7:43 pm

juWuPe
juWuPe
Reps: 203
I believe you should set proper expectation with the parents of these students that the relationship in the classroom and outside the classroom will defer.
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Solution 10
Posted March 7, 2016 12:30 am

Hunabu
Hunabu
Reps: 100
I would say just maintain your professionalism, when talking about school matters of their child. however outside of work and non related school topics you can still remain friends.
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