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Posted on October 18, 2015 7:23 pm
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Henry Hobby
Henry Hobby
Reps: 82
Coteaching
I have a colleague at a former school that is co-teaching with a new teacher this year. This "new" teacher has been teaching for years and has been know to stir up problems. My friend has called on many occasions complained that her co-teacher is not prepared for lessons and not effectively delivering instruction. She wants to talk with her principal about the issues, but does not want to cause trouble between her and her co-teacher. She has to work with this teacher for the rest of the school term. How can she solve this problem without causing tension between her and the co-teacher?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 18, 2015 11:28 pm

VyReJe
VyReJe
Reps: 78
I would think that the chain of command should be followed, and the teachers should have a conversation with each other first. Often, it is a misunderstanding that can be solved with each other before having to go to administration. The administration probably paired them together because he/she knew your friend could help or work with the other person. They should try building a connection with each other.
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aRaLeg
aRaLeg
Reps: 200
Communication is the most important part when working with other teachers!
  Posted on: October 4, 2017 9:20 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 18, 2015 9:13 pm

Dan G
Dan G
Reps: 190
I would not talk to the principle as my first resort to try and solve the issue. She should have a conversation with the teacher directly and see how that goes. As soon as the principle is notified tensions will become high. Although if the issues are not resolved she has no other option but to seek help from the principal.
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Solution 3
Posted October 18, 2015 9:28 pm

Qygata
Qygata
Reps: 76
I am dealing with a very similar situation right now. I have a co-teacher in an algebra class who refuses to learn the algebra. She has been teaching at this school for decades while I have only been here for three years. To be clear, I have no idea how she was allowed to teach here in the first place, but I cannot change that.
Back to the topic, I understand she is not proficient in math, but I told her at the beginning of the year to not be worried, just learn one day ahead of the students. She refused to learn the math. I spoke with her about it. I tried to just not let her teach. Any time she would speak, I would have to speak up to the class and try to help them while not making her look stupid. Then one day she came in my room and bashed me in front of our students. She walked out of the room, and one of our students said, "she's an idiot." I stopped the conversation right there but instantly realized I had to go to administrators. The students know when teachers do not know.
I did end up going one of our assistant principals about the situation. I documented many of the co-teacher's failures. I brought them to the assistant principal. I told the assistant principal I was not trying to bring anyone down, but the actions of this co-teacher were unacceptable. The assistant principal agreed completely. We have been working together to address the co-teacher. It has not been easy at all. The co-teacher has not taken it well. She feels she should not have to do her job and does not like being told to do her job.
The only positive from this is the co-teacher was able to complete one question correctly on the board two weeks ago. She was not able to answer any questions about it, but she successfully completed a one-step linear equation for the first time in her life. So I consider it a small victory, as did the assistant principal.
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edeBaS
edeBaS
Reps: 200
I would firmly discuss with the first coach and explain to them the situation. A lot of times when we solve problems first-hand, our leaders see us like we have a strength. Always try to resolve the solution first, then reach out for other solutions.
  Posted on: February 26, 2016 5:17 pm

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Solution 4
Posted October 18, 2015 10:03 pm

vaHame
vaHame
Reps: 76
I would sit down with her and a coach to have a conversation. Perhaps you could tell your concerns to your coach first then devise a plan to talk with her about these problems. I teach with a co-teacher, and we work really well together. It really benefits everyone when the two of us are on the same page about everything.
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Solution 5
Posted February 22, 2016 3:09 pm

zyWute
zyWute
Reps: 201
Come up with an organization system, where both teachers review the lessons and material before the day of the lesson. This way the teacher will have an opportunity to show the other teacher she is or isn't prepared and has given them a chance.
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Solution 6
Posted October 19, 2015 12:51 am

Erica Turnbull
Erica Turnbull
Reps: 78
Co-teaching is like a marriage, it must flow correctly in order for it to be successful. If the co-teachers have difficulty connecting then the students suffer. At the end of the day, the students are the most important factor. The co-teacher may not realize they are not delivering instruction correctly. With that being said, the general education teacher could offer a refresh meeting. This would be where the gen ed teacher will help refresh the current content to the SPED teacher. As a SPED teacher, I completely understand having to adjust to a new teacher to work with and to build a new relationship with (I had 5 co-teachers last school year). Also, if the gen ed teacher does not meet with the SPED teacher first it can become awkward along with possible tension. The teachers need to be able to express how they feel together to solve their problems.
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Solution 7
Posted February 24, 2016 9:33 pm

anuhag
anuhag
Reps: 201
I believe that she should speak to administration about it. There is no way around the issue of tension unfortunately. But the important thing to think about is who is getting hurt here. It should not be about one another feelings but about how it is effecting the student by the co-teach not doing what they are supposed to be doing. Lets face it the co-teach is in the room for a reason and the reason being because the students in the class need extra help.
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Solution 8
Posted October 9, 2016 1:34 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
The first step would be to talk to the co-teacher. I would discuss the lessons for the week, explain what I have planned and ask what the co-teacher has planned to add to the lessons. Maybe collaborative planning can help with the lessons. I would invite a co-worker I respect to come and observe the class and get feedback on the instructional delivery of the lessons.
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Solution 9
Posted February 23, 2016 3:45 am

apazeR
apazeR
Reps: 200
Chain of command definitely should be followed. Has she tried talking to her first before bringing anyone else in?
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Solution 10
Posted February 26, 2018 4:50 am

Kelsey Lutzi
Kelsey Lutzi
Reps: 200
I believe that honest communication is the best solution. I would approach the teacher with the complaints, and specific situations where it seemed their planning and performance was not what it should be. I would talk about how they could help one another, and if the conversation doesn't produce results, I would ask for a meeting with the next person in the chain of command. I would not approach the principal automatically.
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Solution 11
Posted February 29, 2016 2:47 am

XaSaPe
XaSaPe
Reps: 200
I would follow the chain of command. She has to do what she has to do.
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