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Posted on October 18, 2015 9:33 pm
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Qygata
Qygata
Reps: 76
Speaking Volume
My school has lots of students that do not understand inside voices. They yell in the hallways. They speak loudly in many classrooms. I, on the other hand, do not think it is acceptable to speak so loudly. How do I teach students to use their inside voices in a school that does not?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 18, 2015 10:00 pm

Qanuna
Qanuna
Reps: 130
Unfortunately, you can only control the volume in your class and maybe even the hallway outside of your classroom. Make sure the children know that yelling and being obnoxiously loud in your classroom will not be tolerated because they are in your room. Teachers might see your success and want to implement the same rule in their class.
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
I agree with this.
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:17 pm

PeQyGa
PeQyGa
Reps: 201
I agree with this and would do this if I were in the same situation.
  Posted on: October 12, 2016 2:29 pm

PeQyGa
PeQyGa
Reps: 201
I agree with this and would do this if I were in the same situation.
  Posted on: October 12, 2016 2:30 pm

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Solution 2
Posted February 25, 2016 1:10 am

Jen
Jen
Reps: 225
One thing that I have seen that I love is a poster of a stoplight hanging at the front of the class. There will be a magnetic arrow on the stoplight that shows the students where their volume should be during class. The volume may vary during different activities during the class. It is up to the teacher to move the arrow and let the students the change in volume.
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a great idea!!
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:18 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 18, 2015 11:06 pm

Sophy Shabana
Sophy Shabana
Reps: 100
We use the voice level meter in my classroom, these are the various levels and what they mean

Level 0 - No talking
Level 1 - Whisper
Level 2 - Partner Talk
Level 3 - Group Talk
Level 4 - Presentation Voice
Level 5 - Outdoors

Students are always reminded to utilize specific levels for specific activities. For Think Pair Share they use Level 2 , for Group work it is Level 3 etc. Students are rewarded for using the correct voice levels.
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a good idea to use.
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:18 pm

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Solution 4
Posted October 18, 2015 10:50 pm

PaDemu
PaDemu
Reps: 75
My school adamantly enforces silent hallways. Students must be silent during transitions. In my class, I vary my speaking to display what is and is not appropriate. During group work, I will often say "pause" and assess the volume. Generally the louder they get the more off topic they are. You may reward students for speaking in an appropriate volume in your class. Also, if the same student yells in the hallway, revoke his privilege of being in the hallway with his peers. Hope this helps!
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a good idea.
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:17 pm

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Solution 5
Posted October 18, 2015 10:45 pm

aQahan
aQahan
Reps: 77
I would re-direct the students when possible, but I realize that this is difficult during transitions and such. I have one particular student who has a difficult time communicating in an "inside voice" and I simply explain that I will not answer him when using that tone. He then corrects the problem even if only for a short time.
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a great idea.
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:17 pm

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Solution 6
Posted February 24, 2016 7:28 pm

anuhag
anuhag
Reps: 201
I think that talking with an inside voice is something respectful that you have to teach the students to do. This is something that should be taught inside of the classroom and hopefully be exhibited outside of the classroom as well. Start there and see what happens.
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Solution 7
Posted February 29, 2016 2:42 am

XaSaPe
XaSaPe
Reps: 200
Unfortunately, you can only control what goes on in your classroom. I would start by making sure your students are aware of your expectations. I would re-direct students often. I went to a school where the teacher had a voice level chart. He used the chart for the students to self monitor and re-directed when necessary.
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Solution 8
Posted March 5, 2016 9:24 pm

WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
It is hard to get students to be quiet, especially in the hallways. I would just continue to encourage them to use their inside voices in the classroom and maybe that will transfer over bit after a while. Good Luck!
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Solution 9
Posted October 9, 2016 1:26 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
On the white board draw a noise level graph. Students can see the acceptable level and have a visual you can point to when the level starts rising.
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Solution 10
Posted October 18, 2015 10:51 pm

Shelby Milton
Shelby Milton
Reps: 82
Students have to be shown how to act in the hallways and in the classroom. Model the behavior for the students. Show the students bad behavior, not good behavior, and great behavior. Then have the students ONLY model the good behavior. This will get them to see the difference in good and bad behavior. This will also get the students to understand how loud they really are.
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Solution 11
Posted October 19, 2015 12:07 am

VyReJe
VyReJe
Reps: 78
If this is continuing outside of your classroom, there is not a whole lot that you can do about it individually. However, bring it up as a concern at leadership that it is disturbing classroom instruction, but make sure you have a solution to offer.
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Solution 12
Posted February 26, 2016 6:00 am

eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
A simple lesson plan focusing on this specific top should do the trick. Start back with the basics.
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Solution 13
Posted February 27, 2016 7:53 pm

tuWyDe
tuWyDe
Reps: 192
If the problem is constantly happening in the hallways, I would contact the principal and ask for assistance. If there is a school policy handed from the principal to the teachers who then go over the rules and consequences with the students, for using loud voices then you will see the behaviors start to change.
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Solution 14
Posted March 5, 2016 9:23 pm

WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
It is hard to get students to be quiet, especially in the hallways. I would just continue to encourage them to use their inside voices in the classroom and maybe that will transfer over bit after a while. Good Luck!
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Solution 15
Posted October 8, 2016 4:10 am

yHaReH
yHaReH
Reps: 209
Something that I have found to be super useful in the classroom is when my students become too loud, I will lower my voice to a whisper. When I lower my voice, students are forced to lower there's and even to stop talking so that they may hear me. I will ask them to respond in a whisper tone too and that gets the class volume down quickly and with little effort.
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Solution 16
Posted October 9, 2016 2:40 pm

eTytun
eTytun
Reps: 101
This can be a quick lesson. Have students practice what is a appropriate and what isn't at what times. Incorporate a jingle or clap that can be your classes secret signal they are being too loud. Give students scinerios like walking to lunch, what level should we be at? It's always okay to throw in some rewards too.
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Solution 17
Posted October 9, 2016 7:07 pm

MePyJy
MePyJy
Reps: 205
Having certain volume control problems myself, for the class it ends up being the reminders and rules in place. If some is being loud wither remind them that their doing it or have a hand signals to point out they are being loud. Once they learn when to be quite they may take it to other places.
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Solution 18
Posted October 9, 2016 7:58 pm

Tana Bill
Tana Bill
Reps: 210
Create classroom and transition rules for your students and make sure to reinforce the rules periodically.
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Solution 19
Posted October 9, 2016 11:18 pm

yjeNus
yjeNus
Reps: 202
If want your students to maintain a controlled voice, then it may benefit you to put it in your classroom rules. That way the students are well aware of your expectations inside, and outside, the classroom. The consequences for breaking these rules should be followed to show your students that you mean business.
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Solution 20
Posted October 6, 2017 3:12 pm

BuXaja
BuXaja
Reps: 205
Not yelling/shouting in classrooms and hallways is usually always a schoolwide rule. I would remind students of this daily, and if students still continue to break this rule I would give them consequences such as a detention.
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Solution 21
Posted February 22, 2016 3:04 pm

zyWute
zyWute
Reps: 201
You can model the correct speaking volume, and then give warnings if students go above the proper volume.
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