TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on October 18, 2015 10:53 pm
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

Sophy Shabana
Sophy Shabana
Reps: 100
Student Strong in Math but lacks Reading Skills
Johnny does very well in my co-taught Math class, his grasp of the math content is very strong. In most of the small group settings he is the first one to complete all the answers correctly. HIs number sense is very strong and he is able to comprehend any math concept with ease. However, his reading skills are very low, he is hardly able to decode CVC words or blend them. Therefore,his math grades are really low when it involves reading word problems. I would welcome any suggestions to help Johnny fare well in Math.
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted October 18, 2015 11:20 pm

Shelby Milton
Shelby Milton
Reps: 82
Does your school offer a remediation for reading? At my school, students who are struggling readers can take a remediation class (which only has about 12 students for more individualize purposes) in order to help the students improve on their reading and comprehension. They have this same class for math.
Votes: +15 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:33 pm

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I second that thought. great work!
  Posted on: March 3, 2016 2:01 am

Kathy Allen
Kathy Allen
Reps: 100
Good idea! This could work in many classroom settings.
  Posted on: February 23, 2018 9:59 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2015 12:03 am

VyReJe
VyReJe
Reps: 78
For report card purposes, the math grade should reflect his math achievement. Read the word problems to him or have him read them to you to make sure that he understands what the problem is saying. Start him on RTI because often the discrepancy between math and reading shows a learning disability.
Votes: +5 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:33 pm

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I second that thought. great work!
  Posted on: March 3, 2016 2:01 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted October 19, 2015 12:55 am

uGaLaz
uGaLaz
Reps: 77
As the math teacher you really need to see if you can get him into a remediation reading class or program. You will never have enough time or resources to remediate his reading while still covering your math standards. If you focus on reading with him then his strength, math, could falter and he would not be successful at all.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:33 pm

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I second that thought. great work!
  Posted on: March 3, 2016 2:01 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted October 19, 2015 3:16 am

WubuLe
WubuLe
Reps: 100
There is a program called reading 180 that works very well with reading instruction. I would also focus on Johnny's strengths in math because he can make a great career for himself using the universal language of numbers. You may also want to research other adults that are talented in using the left part of their mind (I believe that is the side for logic and math) and find if it is necessary to rectify this problem.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:33 pm

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I second that thought. great work!
  Posted on: March 3, 2016 2:02 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted March 3, 2016 1:57 am

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I would devise simple word problems with short, non-complex sentences; however, the sentences would revolve around something that he is interested in. This would allow for his attention to actually be focused in on what he is reading, as well as, allowing for a sentence that is easily read and understood.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted October 19, 2015 2:27 am

qasytu
qasytu
Reps: 107
Read the word problem to him first. Then have several students read the word problem along with him, Then have him read it out loud. Ask him to explain what the question is asking him. Ask him to use visual representations to be able to work through what is being read and how it relates to the necessary math computation. Have a discussion with him before hand where you present some of the words in the problem that may give him trouble. Talk about how the word is spelled, what the word means, words that mean the same, opposite, how the word would be pronounced. Also, discuss this problem with his reading teacher to see if there may be some extra practice he/she could provide for the student.
Votes: +2 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:33 pm

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I second that thought. great work!
  Posted on: March 3, 2016 2:01 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted February 28, 2016 8:30 pm

SuGaNe
SuGaNe
Reps: 226
A lot of times when students struggle with reading skills, math questions are allowed to be read out loud to them. I would check to see if this is a possibility. Reading the math questions out loud to the entire class will help him not to be singled out.
Votes: +2 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 8
Posted October 18, 2015 11:00 pm

aQahan
aQahan
Reps: 77
As the end of year assessments are creating the necessity for students to have better reading skills, this is an issue. However, the student may need an accommodation which allows him to get his tests read which will help him develop him math comprehensions. However, this will not help him read better.
Votes: +1 / -3 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed response. Great idea.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:33 pm

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I second that thought. great work!
  Posted on: March 3, 2016 2:02 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 9
Posted October 9, 2016 11:44 pm

JabuDu
JabuDu
Reps: 202
Maybe, work with him on how to decode the word problems and pull out the pertinent information. Aside from working on reading in general, learning what to look for in a math word problem might help him.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.