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Posted on October 19, 2015 12:16 am
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aXyheN
aXyheN
Reps: 114
We All Have that One Child
We all have the one child than can completely change the dynamics of the classroom. This student is extremely disruptive to himself as well as those around him. I have tried isolating this, praising this student, and allowing this student to be the class helper to no avail. What are some other strategies to use with disruptive students?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 19, 2015 1:55 am

gegede
gegede
Reps: 102
Yes. I think it is inevitable that every year a teacher will have that one child. Ironically, this child is never absent or ill. The best way to handle this child's inappropriate behavior is to begin researched based behavioral interventions and track behavior each day using an "ABC" form. I found this to be much easier to use. Additionally, I would meet with the IST for support. I would also visit the records room to see if their was "pertinent" information that was not passed along or simply overlooked. One strategy that I have used is giving students that are over stimulated "brain breaks". Allow them time to draw or sketch, leave their seat and stretch after completing a task. This should not exceed 5-6 minutes and doesn't cause a distraction to other students during instruction. Ground rules must be set prior to attempting this strategy. An example would be, "John you may not bother other students when you leave your seat." or "You can only read your comic book for five minutes, then its back to work." I found that when my student gets to do something they want to do, they work harder to get to the "brain break" this can eventually be eliminated based on the student progress.
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Kady Schlemmer
Kady Schlemmer
Reps: 201
This is a very thorough solution. It is very helpful.
  Posted on: July 9, 2016 6:23 pm

yZaHuM
yZaHuM
Reps: 100
I should keep this in mind.
  Posted on: October 8, 2016 5:42 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2015 12:51 am

eryMav
eryMav
Reps: 75
I think the key to managing disruptive students in the classroom is to keep them engaged in the content through various activities and assignments. It is possible that these students are not being challenged enough academically which is causing their behavior. I would provide these students with more student driven activities and assignments that require critical thinking to keep them focused on the task at hand.
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Solution 3
Posted February 24, 2016 7:13 pm

anuhag
anuhag
Reps: 201
Allowing the student some time to get up from his seat and or helping a student who is at a lower level then him might help. This might make the student feel like they are needed and change the dynamic of the students day.
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Solution 4
Posted October 9, 2016 1:04 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
Try a behavior contract between you and him. Think of a way you can motivate him to behave, like extra computer time, or a new pencil. I would involve the parents send home a copy of the behavior plan with details on how the student behaves in class.
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Solution 5
Posted October 19, 2015 3:13 pm

yZytaz
yZytaz
Reps: 201
A good solution would be researching different ways to handle a student with this type of behavior. Seeing what the students hobbies are or what they like to do and try to incorporate some of those into his lesson. It might take more time to the outcome will be a lot better than having him disrupt other students. Also, get involved with the parents so you both are on the same page when it comes to discipline because it could be that in the house hold they allow some things that you wouldn't in the classroom.
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Solution 6
Posted February 22, 2016 2:52 pm

zyWute
zyWute
Reps: 201
Give the student his own personal incentive program with rewards. If completes his work and does not disrupt the class, he can sit in the teacher's desk etc.
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Solution 7
Posted February 29, 2016 2:23 am

XaSaPe
XaSaPe
Reps: 200
I would try creating a behavior contract with the student. One thing you could implement would be if the student diligently works for a period of time you agree upon, they can have free time to do something that is not disruptive to the other students.
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Solution 8
Posted March 7, 2016 1:58 am

useZyt
useZyt
Reps: 207
I think you need to change up your lessons to make that student feel more involved and responsible. Make sure that they are the teacher's helper that always has a task at hand. They will feel special and like they don't have to act out because they have your attention.
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Solution 9
Posted October 5, 2016 6:30 pm

PuWupe
PuWupe
Reps: 206
I think that you could try to develop a behavior plan, which consists of having other people involved as support. You will measure the student behavior, like how often, for how long; then you will create a hypothesis and a solutions. The down side of it is that it may take a little long for seeing the positive results or it could fail, and that is normal. I will also suggest to have somebody, like an adult to work with the student while you are working with the whole class, maybe the student need support at all times, and you are one for 18-22 students.
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Solution 10
Posted March 5, 2016 9:43 pm

WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
Is the child old enough to be tested for behavioral disorders? Sounds like he has ADD/ADHD. You can send him straight to the office after the first time he does not listen and continue that so he knows you are serious. Call home if you have to.
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Solution 11
Posted February 26, 2016 12:03 am

MaXuDe
MaXuDe
Reps: 200
If none of these routes have worked, try having a conversation with the parents. Explain to them the steps you have taken to try and correct the behaviors. Hopefully the parents can shed some light on the situation and have a discussion with the student about their behavior.
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Solution 12
Posted October 2, 2017 2:29 pm

aWyVys
aWyVys
Reps: 201
Providing him his own incentive chart that is kept private between you, him, and his parents. Creating a united front for the student between home and school will help keep more expectation and stress importance of him behaving. Working to set a goal for the student that interest him will also help possible motivate him to make better decisions.
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Solution 13
Posted February 20, 2018 6:57 pm

WaTeLa
WaTeLa
Reps: 100
Strategies that my CT used included giving incentives such as eating lunch with the PE couch or with the teacher, if he acted out he had to sit in another room or by himself at a table.
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Solution 14
Posted February 25, 2018 11:42 pm

Andrea Howey
Andrea Howey
Reps: 201
If positive behavior does not work take away things he enjoys like recess and make him sit inside
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Solution 15
Posted October 4, 2016 10:13 pm

RyVeta
RyVeta
Reps: 106
talk!
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Solution 16
Posted October 9, 2016 7:32 pm

Tana Bill
Tana Bill
Reps: 210
Postive reinforcement - reward system
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Solution 17
Posted February 27, 2017 2:42 am

Hedese
Hedese
Reps: 202
It might be helpful to develop a specific behavior management plan with this student.
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Solution 18
Posted October 19, 2015 12:24 am

VyReJe
VyReJe
Reps: 78
I have read where students who have trouble concentrating without lots of fidgeting can benefit from the small bicycle-like contraption they can use while at their desk.
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WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
Hmm. I have never heard of that before. Cool idea.
  Posted on: March 5, 2016 9:44 pm

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Solution 19
Posted February 25, 2016 10:24 pm

punybu
punybu
Reps: 201
I think the best way to help a disruptive student is to provide them with various opportunities during a lesson or activity. For example, a math lesson on counting (addition/ subtraction), allow the student to use blocks or other small toys to count with. Also, allow the student to demonstrate their understand to either the entire class or a small group. I think this may allow the student to feel good about their abilities and gain confidence and motivation. For the most part disruptive students are acting out in order to receive attention.
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