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Posted on October 19, 2015 12:38 am
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eryMav
eryMav
Reps: 75
Acting Out
In one of my co-taught classes we have a student that is served under an IEP and acts out constantly. While currently his alignment report has him in the co-taught setting it has become evident that he will be more successful in the resource setting. He lacks many pre-requisite skills that he needs to be successful in this course but his IEP review isn't for another few weeks, so he will be in our class for the remainder of the semester. Because the work can seem very intimidating to him at times, rather than working, he acts out and is a constant disruption to himself and others. What are some strategies I can utilize to keep this student engaged and focused so that he is not a disruption to the rest of the class?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 19, 2015 1:38 am

Erica Turnbull
Erica Turnbull
Reps: 78
Maybe accommodating the student with similar problems that are easier. Changing the content is not allowed unless the student is in a modified curriculum class. I would start with the pre-requistie skills he lacks along with integrating current work. This will allow him to feel as if he is being successful with the hopes of less acting out.
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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2015 3:21 am

uNeNuD
uNeNuD
Reps: 79
Even though the IEP review is not for a while, it does not mean you cannot have a meeting to discuss appropriate accommodations, revising the BIP and services. It sounds like the student is not being successful and acting out. If this is the case, providing assignments with accommodations such as examples, and hints. I would consider a BIP if the student does not already have one.
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Solution 3
Posted October 19, 2015 2:11 am

Jamika Harvey
Jamika Harvey
Reps: 76
I would definitely utilize my co-teacher to break the students into two groups. I would make the group with the student who acts out much smaller. Also within that group, I would place the more mature students who can work collaboratively or independently. This will allow the teacher more time to work individually with that particular student. During the individualized instruction, those pre-requisite skills will be visited. The one-on-one instruction will also make the student more confident in his ability to perform the math skills. This will them lead to the student beginning to feel comfortable and not acting out. I would incorporate frequent rewards for the student to minimize misbehavior. As well as additional help during class, I would also provide the student help outside of class to show him that him learning the content is important to me. When possible, computer-based instruction will also be utilized. Students love technology.

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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
I would defiantly try this idea.
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:03 pm

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Solution 4
Posted October 19, 2015 3:34 am

WubuLe
WubuLe
Reps: 100
I would also attempt to locate something that the student enjoys and use that to teach him with. Requesting some time after school may build a personal bond and develop a relationship that will help guide the student's behavior.
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a great idea!
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:02 pm

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Solution 5
Posted February 23, 2016 3:41 am

apazeR
apazeR
Reps: 200
Have some sort of positive reinforcement for this student. Make a list of things he or she needs to do such as stay in your seat, stay on task, follow directions in order to earn a reward at the end of the day
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a great idea!
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:03 pm

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Solution 6
Posted October 3, 2016 9:59 pm

WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
You can use a number of strategies:
Depending on what his accommodations are, you can give this student extra time to complete the work.
You can modify the lesson to fit the student, have him answer the questions orally, have less expectations from him, and so on.
You can also provide different means of presenting the information, make it hands on or physical so that he is engaged.
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Solution 7
Posted February 25, 2016 10:27 pm

punybu
punybu
Reps: 201
It is usually beneficial to talk with the person in charge of an IEP to understand and learn more about that students needs. It is essential for a teacher to learn as much as they can about their students in order to provide the best instruction for each student's unique needs.
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Solution 8
Posted February 24, 2016 7:12 pm

anuhag
anuhag
Reps: 201
I think giving the student frequent breaks would be the best way to make the work seem not so intimidating to the student. This would allow him to move around for a couple of minutes (not disrupting others) and come back to his seat ready to work.
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Solution 9
Posted February 26, 2016 5:06 pm

edeBaS
edeBaS
Reps: 200
Sometimes changing the IEP, can help the student. Don't ever feel like the student will act the same way with every IEP. The student may be trying to get attention by acting out. It is okay to have a meeting with the IEP and see what options they come up with and how they feel.
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Solution 10
Posted October 19, 2015 3:32 am

WubuLe
WubuLe
Reps: 100
I would give this student some of the major classroom duties so he will remain busy and responsible. I will allow him time to work with groups and provide less teacher directives and more peer directives. I would also not allow him to become a distraction by ignoring some of the behavior. I had a student that would come in a talk nasty. I requested the students not laugh and I acted unmoved and before I knew it he was quite and working because he had no supportive audience/ attention.
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Solution 11
Posted February 22, 2016 2:51 pm

zyWute
zyWute
Reps: 201
Make the activities less intense and overwhelming for the student. Do this my cutting worksheets in half or having him read only half the material at a time.
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Solution 12
Posted February 24, 2016 1:40 am

Taylor Katsarelas
Taylor Katsarelas
Reps: 102
I would try and talk with the person in charge of the IEP meetings or the ESE department and see if their is an opening for reviewing the students IEP. I would also try and talk with the student to understand why the student is acting out and see if there are different things that we can do as a team to help the student. By working with the student, the student will see that you are trying to work with them and is more likely to work with you and not act out as much as before.
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WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
This is a good idea. The student needs to know that you are trying to help. You can also contact the parents and come up with a strategy for the next few weeks until the IEP meeting.
  Posted on: October 3, 2016 10:00 pm

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Solution 13
Posted October 8, 2016 3:47 am

yHaReH
yHaReH
Reps: 209
The root of the problem, like others have said, is that the student finds the work to be too difficult, so the student is not wanting to do the work and instead acts out. It is important to make the appropriate accommodations for the student so that the student is able to practice the skills that he or she learned on his or her appropriate level. Also, allowing the student to work with fellow peers could allow for a fruitful time as his or her confidence could be boosted through working and learning with fellow classmates.
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Solution 14
Posted October 8, 2016 6:27 pm

yZaHuM
yZaHuM
Reps: 100
I would try to find out what the student enjoys. Once you find out the students interests maybe you could work that into a lesson, it could be used to teach him prerequisite skills and to help keep his attention.
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Solution 15
Posted October 9, 2016 12:55 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
I would try having an alternative assignment. It could be on the same topic but at a different level and less amount of the problems.
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Solution 16
Posted October 9, 2016 7:41 pm

Tana Bill
Tana Bill
Reps: 210
1. Remediation
2. Trying to find activities or books that may interest the student
3. Having the child sit close to you
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Solution 17
Posted February 29, 2016 2:17 am

XaSaPe
XaSaPe
Reps: 200
I would definitely review the accommodations provided to the student. Maybe he just needs a little extra something to ensure his success. Try some new accommodations.
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yDydez
yDydez
Reps: 100
This is a good idea, always check the IEP.
  Posted on: October 4, 2016 5:04 pm

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