TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on October 19, 2015 3:21 am
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

ypyPuT
ypyPuT
Reps: 126
PreK rigor
Ms. Thomas is a Pre-K teacher in a public school. She understands and is knowledgeable of the skills that students will be learning in Kindergarten and upper grades. In order to better prepare her students for Kindergarten she begins teaching them sight words. The Pre-K director for the county visits Ms. Thomas class and questions the sight word instruction. Their argument is that it is not in the Pre-K standards to teach sight words, and that Pre-K students may not be cognitively prepared for that kind of instruction.

What should the teacher do?

Do you agree that teachers should not teach sight words in Pre-K?
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted October 21, 2015 3:14 am

vapaju
vapaju
Reps: 126
As a second grade teacher presently and a past pre-k teacher, I feel that the more the students are exposed to the better. Once they are in kindergarten the expectation of expressing their thoughts in writing emerge. Good readers produce good writing. In fact, good readers are usually great communicators. Exposing the Pre-K students to sight words will give them a greater chance of embedding them in their long term memory. I would suggest after drilling no more than four to five sight words a week that the same sight words be used and pointed out in other ways throughout the week. This could be in shared readings, small groups, within the print rich environment, and/or within the centers.
Votes: +54 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Natalie Taylor
Natalie Taylor
Reps: 200
This is a very good and detailed article.
  Posted on: February 22, 2016 2:28 pm

Kady Schlemmer
Kady Schlemmer
Reps: 202
I agree with this solution. It gives the students ample opportunity for success.
  Posted on: July 9, 2016 7:44 pm

uWuXyj
uWuXyj
Reps: 232
I agree completely with your solution! I have never heard of someone saying that teaching a child new things was a bad thing?? I like how you explained that it is kind of like a ripple effect where learning really affects almost everything.
  Posted on: October 16, 2016 3:10 pm

Kathy Allen
Kathy Allen
Reps: 100
I think it is never too early to start preparing students for what they will learn. This is a great idea!
  Posted on: February 23, 2018 7:28 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted October 24, 2015 1:17 pm

PysaHe
PysaHe
Reps: 101
I believe that there are developmentally appropriate ways to expose children who are ready for beginning sight words. Some students begin pre-k with a fall birthday, almost five. If they have had structured daycare experiences, they have already been exposed to sensory and literacy activities. Differentiation begins in PK. If students are not ready, don't teach sight words to them. My daughter began preK this year, and falls in this category- being 5 already, spending her toddler years in daycare, and having good stimulation from family. She knows all of her letters and sounds, and is beginning to teach herself to spell. Why not give those students early exposure? My advice would be to check online sources, like teacherspayteachers, pinterest, etc. and find fun, developmentally appropriate centers and games to introduce sight words to those who are ready.
Votes: +17 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted February 27, 2016 7:57 pm

yDaTes
yDaTes
Reps: 126
As a former Pre-K teacher, I introduced sight words as well. Learning is developmental and some of the students were advanced and ready for this step. However, they were not assessed or penalized if they did not know the words. It was mearly exposure to get them ready for K.
Votes: +13 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted February 28, 2016 8:15 pm

SuGaNe
SuGaNe
Reps: 226
I think it is appropriate to begin teaching sight words in Pre-k, even if it is not in the standards. For students who are not cognitively ready to learn this, they are still getting a feel for the kindergarten atmosphere which makes for an easier transition. I think the teacher should teach sight words, but not rigorously. Maybe making up a song that spells a few words and interchanging them every few weeks, or labeling the room with sight words would be good options.
Votes: +12 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted February 25, 2016 11:50 pm

aNaQev
aNaQev
Reps: 201
The teacher could incorporate learning sight words in activities that follow the Pre-K standards.
Votes: +10 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted March 1, 2016 4:20 am

aryBaV
aryBaV
Reps: 125
As many of the other posts have stated, there is nothing wrong with exposing the students to sight words at such a young age. I feel the issue may come into place if a teacher were to evaluate the students on these words. I feel that a formal eval would be out of the question, but exposing the children on a daily basis would be a great idea.
Votes: +6 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted February 25, 2017 3:54 pm

Melissa Dison
Melissa Dison
Reps: 327
Hello ypyPuT!

While it is important to abide by state standards, I totally agree with vapaju's solution above. Vapaju did a great job at highlighting the major benefits of using sight words with PreK students. I agree that exposure is beneficial, and there are a lot of things that students should have exposure to - even if it is not time for them to master that skill yet. However, I would add to vapaju's solution by suggesting that Ms. Thomas should not let sight word practice dominant her curriculum. When the class has extra time, exposure to sight words is great. However if the students have not mastered specific skills aligned in the their current PreK standards yet, they should be focusing on those skills or remediating those skills first before exposing them to something that is not at their grade level.

Melissa
Votes: +6 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 8
Posted February 25, 2016 11:28 pm

MaXuDe
MaXuDe
Reps: 200
I feel that, at such a young age, the more these students are exposed to information the better off they will be. It may take longer for students this young to fully understand the information, but if delivered properly i feel that presenting students with this information early better prepares them for future learning.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

aryBaV
aryBaV
Reps: 125
This will prepare them for higher learning, as long as the rigor is minimal sight words at such a young age are very important
  Posted on: March 1, 2016 4:23 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 9
Posted March 5, 2016 9:08 pm

WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
I think that the purpose of Pre-K is to get the children ready for Kindergarten. If reading site words is something easy and fun that can be done in a Pre-K class than I see no harm in it.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 10
Posted February 29, 2016 1:55 am

uJasuX
uJasuX
Reps: 203
There is nothing wrong with exposing children to knowledge early.
Votes: +3 / -8 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 11
Posted March 3, 2016 12:32 am

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I think that is important that children learn sight words as early as possible because with the use of computers most children recognize site words already. My daughter school teaches them and I do also.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 12
Posted October 9, 2016 9:47 pm

JabuDu
JabuDu
Reps: 202
The teacher should make certain that they are able to effectively teach all Pre-K standards. As long as this is met, early exposure to material will only benefit the students as long as it is shown at their level of understanding.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 13
Posted October 10, 2016 7:01 pm

ZaBuBy
ZaBuBy
Reps: 200
I do agree that teachers should not teach sight words in PRE-K
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 14
Posted October 12, 2016 2:48 pm

PeQyGa
PeQyGa
Reps: 201
I think it is wonderful to begin introducing students to sight words. They will see them in kindergarten so this will just make them even better prepared for this grade. The more they see, the better. This will give them the opportunity to be better students.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 15
Posted February 26, 2017 9:31 pm

eHebah
eHebah
Reps: 208
I don't think it hurts to expose them to sight words. Certainly every student will not be ready for them but for the few that are they are available. Reading is the key to success the more we can teach students that, the better off they will be.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 16
Posted February 25, 2018 12:38 pm

geSuNy
geSuNy
Reps: 205
Having experience working with a VPK program, I believe students can learn sight words. While there are students who need the whole year to learn to spell their name, write their name, count, recognize letters and their sounds; there are other students who are ready to move on to sight words and word families. Try pulling small groups according to students learning needs and differentiate instruction.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 17
Posted October 9, 2017 3:53 pm

vugage
vugage
Reps: 201
Implementing the sight words is a great idea. However, you must continue to differentiate instruction for students who are not ready for sight words. Look at each student individually and assess their ability.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 18
Posted July 2, 2018 12:08 pm

Dawn Palaio
Dawn Palaio
Reps: 100
I think she should teach the 2wy she feels is right. And maybe sit down with the director and come to a half way solution, following both ideas. I think kids should learn early on.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 19
Posted October 5, 2018 1:13 am

yGapeW
yGapeW
Reps: 202
Students should definitely be exposed to sight words! The earlier the better. If you could somehow provide data for the director to show him/her how this is beneficial, i'm sure you could change their mind.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 20
Posted October 12, 2018 10:56 pm

baGyvy
baGyvy
Reps: 100
I absolutely think that teachers should be able to teach sight words in Pre-K. I feel like the only thing that it doing is helping the students to be better prepared for when they do go to kindergarten. It will only help them to become better students in the future and help them learn more and may even help them to succeed at a faster rate.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.