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Posted on October 19, 2015 3:30 am
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Jamika Harvey
Jamika Harvey
Reps: 76
Parents Who Complete Student Projects
A particular project is given at the beginning of the nine weeks. Students are to complete it at home and bring it in on or before the due date. A rubric and directions for the project have been given. You allow the students time to work on the project during class or particular days. When the project is due, the student brings in an elaborate project and it is obvious that the student has not done the project. When you ask the student questions during their presentation, they cannot answer them. How do you prevent these situations from reoccuring?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 23, 2015 1:08 am

LeHaWy
LeHaWy
Reps: 154
I would make the projects more in class. I would make it so they can do research at home, but the actual construction be done in class. If you prefer to have at home projects done I would make the student redo the project if they can't answer any questions about it. This way the student and the parent both know that the student must be the one doing the bulk of the work.
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Solution 2
Posted October 19, 2015 3:52 am

ypyPuT
ypyPuT
Reps: 126
Hello Jamika,
I would have a conference with the parents to talk about your concerns. I would explain the importance of students' taking leadership of their own learning and work. At the same time I would discuss the need for him to prove what they know and are capable of to earn a grade. Lastly, similar to what you should have done with your students at the beginning of the year, talk to the parents about the expectations for the course and how their student should respond upon receiving an assignment.
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Kady Schlemmer
Kady Schlemmer
Reps: 201
I agree that it is important to communicate with the parents the expectations of the child.
  Posted on: July 9, 2016 4:13 pm

PeMuQa
PeMuQa
Reps: 200
I agree. Communication with the parents is important for a successful classroom, and allowing them the chance to talk to you about the projects is a helpful chance for them to learn.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 1:06 am

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Solution 3
Posted February 27, 2016 11:48 pm

yDaTes
yDaTes
Reps: 126
In addition to talking with the parents after the fact. It may be beneficial to be proactive and send out an letter or email to the parents emphasizing how important it is for the students to complete the project independently.
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Solution 4
Posted March 2, 2016 3:56 pm

uhyJas
uhyJas
Reps: 100
I wouldn't let the project go home, and see if that helps. If that still doesn't help you could make it classroom project only where they don't bring it home or even do research at home.
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Solution 5
Posted March 9, 2016 8:55 pm

aZyLeq
aZyLeq
Reps: 102
Many parents just find it easier to do this for their child and it is not right. I would make this project more step by step based. Have a worksheet due for each step that was completed. Make sure the worksheet is detailed and that the child has time in class to do the worksheet. If you have the child do all the research and time to make the project in class then this skips the parents involvement other than buy the supplies.
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Solution 6
Posted October 12, 2016 7:24 pm

jaDehy
jaDehy
Reps: 200
I would create weekly checklist to see if the student is indeed working on their project throughout the nine weeks.
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Solution 7
Posted February 23, 2016 10:17 pm

Chelsea
Chelsea
Reps: 103
Hi there,

If I were in your situation I would schedule a conference with the parents. At the conference you could explain to the parents that doing projects for them will not help them learn. The learning process is more important than grades. If you do more projects in the future, I would have the students mostly work on them in class, that way you can ensure that they are individually completing the work.
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Solution 8
Posted March 7, 2016 1:00 am

apamat
apamat
Reps: 100
I think the best way to prevent this situation is to make the project something fun for the student to do by themselves. It shouldn't have elaborate instructions that can't be done by a student in your classroom; parents can help but shouldn't be doing the assignment.
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Solution 9
Posted July 9, 2016 7:17 pm

PuWupe
PuWupe
Reps: 206
I think that one option could be when giving the project directions, the teacher could explain that there have been some students who in previous years have had their parents/relatives to their projects and then the students would not be able to answer questions about their project; also reaffirm that you would be able to tell if it was their own work or if they have been helped.
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Solution 10
Posted July 11, 2016 12:08 am

kelsey karr
kelsey karr
Reps: 105
There are two techniques I would implement to avoid this issue. The first would be to allow students to work on in it class from time to time so the teacher is able to observe their progress and work.
Also, I would make check points through out the nine weeks were the students bring in parts of their draft or project for review. This would have to be the students work with their current progress shown on it. This would eliminate some of the help from the parent making the student more involved and doing their own project.
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Solution 11
Posted October 17, 2016 2:42 am

qunumy
qunumy
Reps: 201
I would require the students to work on more of the project in class. I would also mention to the students that students are to do the projects themselves. You could mention that if the students cannot answer the questions during their presentations that they will receive points off.
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Solution 12
Posted July 9, 2017 5:14 pm

NaPeqe
NaPeqe
Reps: 104
There are many good solutions here. In class projects are probably the only way to ensure the student is doing his or her own work fully. if a student cannot answer questions on his or her project, then he or she didn't learn anything about it. This should result in either the student needing to redo the project, or failing it. It might not seem fair to allow a student to redo the project, but it is more important that the student learn the material. If they redo it, give them a different grade scale. Maybe if they have to redo the project, they don't get full credit, but can still ear a passing grade. Contact with the parents is also a good idea. The parents may think they are helping their student, but show them the notes from the student's presentation and let them realize that their student didn't actually learn. This might help reduce parents taking over their child's projects.
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Solution 13
Posted October 10, 2016 12:02 am

PeQyGa
PeQyGa
Reps: 201
I would let the student know that you can only give them partial credit because they only completed part of the project. Then I would email mom or dad to inform them of the situation and let them know how important it is for the student to do their own assignments because this is how they will learn things.
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Solution 14
Posted February 25, 2016 11:56 pm

aNaQev
aNaQev
Reps: 201
Conference with parents asking them if they assisted with the project.
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Solution 15
Posted October 9, 2016 6:51 pm

yDyjuB
yDyjuB
Reps: 203
student should be held to realistic expectations and parents should be aware that their students project with be graded on a given rubric AND the students ability explain their project.
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Solution 16
Posted October 10, 2016 6:35 pm

ZaBuBy
ZaBuBy
Reps: 200
It is hard to confront this situation. I agree with the others and that a casual conference would be best.

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Solution 17
Posted October 13, 2016 8:28 pm

Jillian Rintrona
Jillian Rintrona
Reps: 103
You would possibly talk with that student one on one to explain what was expected.
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Solution 18
Posted March 6, 2017 2:34 am

Andrea Howey
Andrea Howey
Reps: 201
I don't think there is anyway to prevent the parents on helping the student with the project, I would just recommended that parents help minimal for it doesn't let the child learn.
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Solution 19
Posted October 3, 2017 2:35 am

Yeilin Ramirez
Yeilin Ramirez
Reps: 200
One solution for this is to turn it into a in class project. Since it will take almost an entire semester, there would be enough time to focus on the project and the state standards.
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Solution 20
Posted October 12, 2017 2:52 am

aRaLeg
aRaLeg
Reps: 200
Creating this as a total class project and sending a letter to parents is a solution for this to make sure the parents do not take too much control
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