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Posted on July 5, 2016 3:08 pm
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buhyLu
buhyLu
Reps: 106
Behavioral Issues
I have student who is an excellent student but has issues with behavior. Some days she's a perfect student does her work, has a great attitude and some days she refused to do anything. She will walk out of class, talk back and throw temper tantrums and sometimes take her head and slam it into the wall. Her mom has take her to doctors and specialist but they all seem to come up with nothing. The mom is getting frustrated and so am I. What can be done about this? Any suggestions or explanations?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted July 8, 2016 3:27 am

eHebah
eHebah
Reps: 208
I would start with documenting her days.
Is there a pattern of behavior?
Speak with prior teachers.
Can the counselor help at school?
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WuzyJa
WuzyJa
Reps: 203
How old is the student? Age may play a factor here. Also, keep track of days that she misbehaves. I would try and test her for special education, she could have a form of ADHD or Autism.
  Posted on: October 3, 2016 7:28 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 4, 2016 4:40 pm

upyRyX
upyRyX
Reps: 185

I agree, documentation is key. I would be sure to document what triggers the student and how long the incidents last. Waiting is hard, but in the meantime could you sit down with the parent and come up with a plan that you can both use as home and school to cope with the behavior? I feel like being on the same page as the parent will help.
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Solution 3
Posted October 5, 2016 12:02 am

yDyjuB
yDyjuB
Reps: 203
I would recommend creating a response to intervention plan (or similar classroom behavior plan/goals) for this student, regardless of receiving a doctor's diagnosis. Starting by paying close attention to what could be triggering this behavior and speak to parents whenever there is a "bad day." Create goals and interventions that are designed specifically to cater to the student.
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Solution 4
Posted October 7, 2016 9:58 pm

uzyXuV
uzyXuV
Reps: 208
It's good her mom is ivolved so you can work as a team. I would keep daily behavior report every day and this should be sent home for her mother to sign. I would start off the day with a system of 1-5 show me how you feel 1 being bad, 5 being great. This allows students to discuss anything that went work like they did not sleep enough, or feel sick. It will only take 10 minutes of your day and you can have a good idea how you students came to class
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Solution 5
Posted October 9, 2016 4:20 am

eTytun
eTytun
Reps: 101
I would try and create a management for the student. Find out what the student enjoys and use that to your advantage. I have used a sticker book with a student who acted out and left class. Once the student got "x" amount of stickers she recived a reward or prize. The student really enjoyed the individual attention, as time went on we upped the amount of stickers needed for prizes.
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Solution 6
Posted October 7, 2016 1:37 am

Krystalynn Gulczewski
Krystalynn Gulczewski
Reps: 203
Persistence is key. I think that the parent may need to keep trying to find a doctor that can help diagnose the issue. It could be a problem of the doctor not seeing it before or it needs to be seen in person. When I was young my mother had to go to dozens of doctors in order to figure out what I had.
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Solution 7
Posted October 8, 2016 11:35 pm

uBuDub
uBuDub
Reps: 154
I would keep log of her outburst and tantrums and find the common denominator and see if you can fix it. if all else false see if your student qualifies for special needs program so that way she can get all the helps she need.
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Solution 8
Posted October 9, 2016 10:26 pm

yZytaz
yZytaz
Reps: 201
I would start by tracking her outburts. Try to pin point why one occurs and see if that has anything to do with them. Sometimes students will be triggered by something that causes them to act like that. I would continue to talk with the parents and maybe th administration and guidance department can help with the behavior issues.
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Solution 9
Posted October 10, 2016 12:57 am

uBuDap
uBuDap
Reps: 201
I have noticed many suggesting logging her behavior, and involving her mother (which is GREAT that she is involved), but I think it is equally important to involve the student as well. I would suggest having her keep a daily journal with standard questions to gauge how she is feeling in the morning when she arrives. On days she misbehaves, see if there is a correlation in how she is feeling and her behavior. Talking with her is important as well. Try to get some information out of her on a lighter level, without putting her on the spot or feeling pressured. Get some more information out of her regarding her home life. Is something bothering her on a personal level? Be a friend.
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Solution 10
Posted October 4, 2016 10:11 pm

RyVeta
RyVeta
Reps: 106
talk!
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