TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on October 10, 2016 1:45 am
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

uDuTaV
uDuTaV
Reps: 100
Self-abuse
I have an ESE student that hits himself in the head at random. He also bangs his for arms on the bottom of the desk. I am new to this student, and I am trying out some new techniques with him. One of his teachers has told me that he is doing these behaviors for attention. I would like to pursue some other avenues in order to explore his intentions. Do I listen to the veteran teacher, or do I follow my instincts?
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted October 10, 2016 2:12 am

uVejeg
uVejeg
Reps: 205
I think you should take the veteran teacher's information into account and then look into his IEP for possible information, too. Pursue you own avenues because what has occurred in the past has not made the student stop the behavior. If he is able to control the behavior, develop a positive plan to encourage him to not self-harm.
Votes: +45 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

uSaPeL
uSaPeL
Reps: 201
I agree that taking a look at this history may be the first step in to figuring about best to approach this student and what has and hasn't worked in the past, etc.
  Posted on: October 12, 2016 12:22 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted October 10, 2016 1:54 am

MePyJy
MePyJy
Reps: 205
While it is good to hear out other teachers for their opinions he is still your responsibility. If he is hurting himself it should either be in his IEP and should give reasons and way to prevent. If it isn't then one you need to stop the action before he does something too damaging, contact both administrators and the parent so everyone is in the loop and find a good way for him to vent this kind of behavior.
I have been in a classroom with a student that has a tendency to self and this particular student has a aide with him at all times to prevent this kind of behavior but this situation is also inside an ESE specific building and he would considered severely or profoundly handicapped.
Votes: +19 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

PeQyGa
PeQyGa
Reps: 201
I would do this if I were in this same situation. It is important to take the other teacher's thoughts into consideration but you should also pursue your own avenues.
  Posted on: October 12, 2016 2:05 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted October 10, 2016 1:49 am

LeWuVy
LeWuVy
Reps: 125
This behavior could possibly be related to ASD. I would try and get to know more about the student to decipher whether he is actually doing it for attention or not. I think you should listen to the veteran teacher to an extent, but following your instincts to find out why he is doing it and/or how to help prevent the behavior is a good idea too.
Votes: +9 / -4 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted October 17, 2016 2:40 am

Sieara Voegtle
Sieara Voegtle
Reps: 202
I believe it is good to have ideas and previous tactics from the veteran teacher, but I do also believe it is important to try your own thing and see if you're able to handle the situation differently. It is very important to include the parent in on any changes as well.
Votes: +5 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted February 21, 2017 12:06 am

aMyvaz
aMyvaz
Reps: 201
Always take what others say with you but also follow your intuition. Maybe looking into this student's IEP would give you some necessary insight.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted February 21, 2017 2:25 am

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
I think that I would take in consideration of what the veteran teacher said however I would also follow my instincts. I would test out somethings and observe and make my own conclusion from the behaviors that he displays. I would also find something to calm him whenever he starts to self-destruct.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted February 21, 2017 9:51 pm

uJuPyS
uJuPyS
Reps: 202
Take the advice of the veteran teacher, but also follow your instinct. You are the one in the classroom now, therefore you know what is occurring. It is important to keep the students safe, so follow your instinct.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 8
Posted February 22, 2018 3:22 am

tuBaZu
tuBaZu
Reps: 200
Find a space and an outlet for the student to release the frustrations. Create incentives to using the coping mechanism and not hurting themselves. Do not give extra attention for the misbehavior as to take in to account of what the classroom teacher says but find a way for the student to find another physical outlet. Stress balls, going into the hall for jumping jacks or sprints or an area away from watching peers.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 9
Posted February 19, 2018 11:47 pm

yzujyV
yzujyV
Reps: 198
Try contacting the parents about the situation and possibly referring the student to see the school's guidance counselor.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 10
Posted February 20, 2018 7:01 pm

WaTeLa
WaTeLa
Reps: 100
I would take what the previous teacher has told you into account but you need to make your own observation to come up with what you think would be the best thing to do for this student.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 11
Posted February 25, 2018 2:03 am

eLaGag
eLaGag
Reps: 202
I would follow the veteran teacher, but if the student continues to do these actions even when you aren't giving him attention from it, I would try what you are suggesting and explore his intentions. Contacting a parent might help as well, they may know why. It could be a tick, etc.
Votes: +0 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 12
Posted February 26, 2017 7:30 pm

beTyze
beTyze
Reps: 211
I would do a little of both just to be on the safe side. Talk to him and get him help. There is always reason as to why students act a certain way and I feel you should get to the bottom of it.
Votes: +0 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 13
Posted February 24, 2017 3:14 am

eZuGeQ
eZuGeQ
Reps: 200
I have a student that does this as well. My CT tells me it is because he is on the Autism spectrum. She suggests, trying to make sure he is fully engaged in lessons, and if you notice the student hitting them self, then to find a way to gently redirect them back to the lesson.
Votes: +0 / -3 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.