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Posted on October 10, 2016 4:06 am
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QaNese
QaNese
Reps: 102
Ants in Pants
In my internship there is a student that can not sit still, and is often a distraction for the other students. The teacher often allows him to stand next to his desk while he is working. This seemed to work for a short while, but now his constant fidgeting has become even more of a distraction. Has anyone found any helpful tactics that could help?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 10, 2016 1:18 pm

uBuDap
uBuDap
Reps: 201
I mentioned this on another post, but my friend has what she calls alternative seating in her class. When she taught kindergarten, this meant that they sat on the floor (with the tables lowered). In her older class now, she uses medicine balls. This allows them to move and fidget without being a distraction. You would just need to set ground rules such as no bouncing, throwing, etc. She loves having it and says she has noticed significant improvement in her student's attention spans.
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PeQyGa
PeQyGa
Reps: 201
I love this and if I were in this situation this is what I would do.
  Posted on: October 12, 2016 1:10 pm

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree with this solution.
  Posted on: March 6, 2017 4:35 am

yLeQud
yLeQud
Reps: 101
i agree to having alternative seating.
  Posted on: October 14, 2017 10:43 pm

rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
That medicine ball idea is great!
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:58 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 12, 2016 5:52 pm

jaDehy
jaDehy
Reps: 200
The best way to deal with students who fidget would be to give them a task that when they can complete when they have finished their work and not while you are instructing. For example, letting the student clean the white board, running some papers down to the front office, or helping you some assignments. If it really is becoming an issue you should talk to the student's parents to see if it happens at home, if it does, then recommend the child for ADD/HD testing.
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yLeBun
yLeBun
Reps: 200
I really like the idea of the ball being used as a chair.
  Posted on: February 26, 2017 10:21 pm

rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
Yes, you made need outside help here.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:58 am

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Solution 3
Posted February 25, 2017 3:57 pm

Robert Hendler
Robert Hendler
Reps: 203
I believe the use of Fidget toys could be helpful in this situation. Also the use of a movement space option that would be helpful give the student their own safe place to move away from the students to not distract others.
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rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
Right! Fidget toys were made for this purpose.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:59 am

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Solution 4
Posted February 21, 2017 10:13 pm

uJuPyS
uJuPyS
Reps: 202
In my internship last semester, I put a workout band around the student's chair. Whenever the student felt the need to move, he kicked the band. It did not distract other students and it fulfilled his need to move.
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Solution 5
Posted February 26, 2017 12:33 am

ReRege
ReRege
Reps: 203
Maybe let him go to the bathroom or get a drink of water every now and then when he gets really bad so he can just walk around without being a distraction. If he starts to fall behind in his school work though and continues to be uncontrollably fidgety I'd get a guidance counselor maybe and schedule an appointment with the parents (with the guidance counselor there) and brainstorm some ideas together to better help their son or maybe take him to the doctor to see what's wrong with him.
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Solution 6
Posted October 4, 2017 8:08 pm

uSaPeL
uSaPeL
Reps: 201
In my internship, I have a student in my classroom who is just like this and my teacher has done a great job at keeping this student's fidgeting to a minimum and that's because she always keeps this student busy! She gives him tasks, such as collecting homework, and handing out supplies, and that has seemed to work.
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Solution 7
Posted February 21, 2017 12:18 am

uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
There may be a reason why this student can not sit still. So I would attempt to find the root to the problem. Maybe the child has a sugary breakfast or has AD/HD. I would speak with the teacher and explain to the teacher what you have observed and see what his/her input to why the child is fidgety. The student may in pain or bored so until my opinion is talking with the teacher.
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Solution 8
Posted February 24, 2017 2:13 am

LuLyHa
LuLyHa
Reps: 226
Teachers can create simple tools for students to use to help with the wiggles like filling balloons with water beads for students to hold in their hands. Stress balls are also great fidget tools for kids who need extra stimulation. Focus on the students' senses when trying to fix this problem, they likely need more stimulation.
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Solution 9
Posted February 25, 2017 7:29 pm

nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
Elementary? Have you heard of GoNoodle? It's like an educational dancing simulator. My CTs usually use it at the end of the day to let the students take a break after a long day of lessons. We have movers too. I am thinking that if maybe we used GoNoodle in the morning that it might wear some of the energetic ones down and give them a chance to get it out of their system. Alternately, you could do some morning stretches, or movements to get the kids motivated for the day.
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Solution 10
Posted February 26, 2017 7:20 pm

beTyze
beTyze
Reps: 211
I would tell his parents. It sounds like he has ADHD and could use some medical help. If that's not an option have him run around the class for a few minutes until he gets it out of his system.
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Solution 11
Posted February 26, 2017 9:50 pm

eHebah
eHebah
Reps: 208
Have the child be the paper passer outer, Need something from the office?
Has this child been tested? Start there. They may need an IEP which would offer clear ideas on what you can do to help the student and class.
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Solution 12
Posted July 10, 2017 10:07 pm

uReZyW
uReZyW
Reps: 101
That could be a good solution
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Solution 13
Posted October 3, 2017 12:45 am

uzebyn
uzebyn
Reps: 200
Giving options for seating and teaching in chunks is beneficial. Let them all get up and stretch or stand up and be sure to offer different ways of sitting during the entire day so they are not forced to the same space all day.
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Solution 14
Posted October 7, 2018 5:38 pm

yGudaj
yGudaj
Reps: 102
Fidget toys are a known way to help students stay on track. If possible, getting a medicine ball or squishy seats can also keep students less distracted.
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Solution 15
Posted February 27, 2017 3:23 am

Hedese
Hedese
Reps: 202
Create a reward system.
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Solution 16
Posted October 7, 2017 2:16 pm

ereTuB
ereTuB
Reps: 202
Wobble stools! They gently wobble to allow students to move while sitting at their desks. I find they are very helpful for students with these types of issues.
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Solution 17
Posted February 20, 2018 4:55 pm

WaTeLa
WaTeLa
Reps: 100
Something I have seen teachers that I intern with do is give the student a medicine ball to sit on, they are able to rock back and forth without causing to much distraction. Also, putting a small patch of Velcro on their desk for them to touch seems to help.
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Solution 18
Posted February 26, 2018 12:22 am

duNuJy
duNuJy
Reps: 203
Have the student sit on an exercise ball. They can bounce and still be sitting down.
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Solution 19
Posted October 6, 2018 5:32 am

yNeruj
yNeruj
Reps: 200
I have seen behavior management plans for students in similar situations. Give the student a time goal, such as five-ten minutes to start off where they work at their desk. After however long, they get a few minutes to jump around and fidget. As they get better, extend the time. I have also seen students that texture cubes and fidget spinners help keep them on task and less disruptive.
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Solution 20
Posted October 13, 2017 3:04 am

Xaparu
Xaparu
Reps: 201
Sounds like this student has ADHD calling the parents and having their child tested would probably be a good idea.
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Solution 21
Posted October 17, 2016 1:12 am

Sieara Voegtle
Sieara Voegtle
Reps: 202
In a classroom that I observed, one of the students had a similar problem. What I noticed worked for her classroom was a reward system. If the child behaved and was on task he was able to receive a small reward at the end of the week.
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uQaMeV
uQaMeV
Reps: 200
This is a good incentive.
  Posted on: February 21, 2017 12:19 am

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