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Posted on March 2, 2013 12:52 am
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Zafer Unal
Zafer Unal
Reps: 953
My kid will be labeled “slow”
You are an elementary teacher, and Sarah Readome struggles with reading. Title I services are available, and you have consulted with the Title I teacher. However, Sarah’s mom is hesitant to agree. She is concerned that Sarah will be labeled “slow,” and she doesn’t want any extra attention focused on her daughter. Sarah’s mom’s permission is necessary for Title I intervention. What would you do?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted March 2, 2013 11:08 am

TaHazy
TaHazy
Reps: 115
This is a very common issue a teacher will run into when attempting to obtain permission for services needed. The best way to do this is to relay the information in a kind and nurturing, yet concise manner. Be well prepared and have back-up to your claims, and show the things you have already done and how they did or did not work.

Explain to Sarah's mother that Sarah would absolutely not be labeled "slow" if she were to receive these services. Firstly, slow is not a label used in school. Let her know what kind of labels we do use in the school, such as: at risk, making gains, and performing at grade level and not performing at grade level. These "labels" are given to students based on performance regardless of services given. Since this is the first time this is being brought to the parent, go slow and show her data of where Sarah's reading level is and where she may fall in the class and grade level ranks. This will show her that Sarah is not the only student in class that will be taking advantage of the services, and therefore will not be singled out in any way. This also shows her why Sarah may need extra help. Explain that there are many forms of help that she can receive, but one option is before and/or after school tutoring. This would not take place in class and would include her peers that are receiving the same services.

Parents usually want the best for their child and are hesitant because they do not want their child to be made fun of, or feel that they are "dumb." Your job is to reassure them that neither will happen and that you are looking into the best interest of the student. The earlier sooner that Sarah receives services, the sooner she will start to improve.
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Comments posted for this solution

Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
This idea would be very logical. I would do the same.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 10:34 pm

ymuXyg
ymuXyg
Reps: 100
Yeah, this is delicate but the mom needs to understand that it'll be for her daughter's benefit. Talking to the mother and explaining this to her is the best suggestion!
  Posted on: October 18, 2015 6:53 pm

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Solution 2
Posted April 18, 2013 6:43 pm

ZeNyJe
ZeNyJe
Reps: 101
In this situation I would specifically explain to the parent how the intervention will benefit Sarah in many ways. I would also explain what would happen if she does not receive the helps she needs. Explain to the parent that if the problem addressed now it will be better for her future. I would have recorded data on the Sarah that shows her low reading levels or even have student work samples. It would also be beneficial of have Sarah read to her mother.
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Comments posted for this solution

ezaDyR
ezaDyR
Reps: 100
Stating the facts and how it can benefit her is a huge part. Parents need to be aware of what is beneficial to their child. They also need to be aware that without any help it has a possibility of getting worse each year. Later on it may be too late to fix anything.
  Posted on: October 17, 2014 12:15 am

Chelsea
Chelsea
Reps: 101
I agree that it is important to stress that the classes will benefit her daughter. I also feel that it is a good idea to have a log of data for Sarah, that way the mom can easily see the struggles her daughter is having. I can understand that as a mother she wants to avoid any stigma associated with her daughter, but getting Sarah help is more important.
  Posted on: October 18, 2014 11:13 pm

uJabaz
uJabaz
Reps: 100
Excellent suggestion!
  Posted on: February 26, 2015 6:19 pm

Natisha
Natisha
Reps: 99
Having examples for parents to see will help a teacher's case.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 12:43 am

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Solution 3
Posted April 18, 2013 6:49 pm

uheZeN
uheZeN
Reps: 122
Having a parent be hesitant to agree to extra services is common as no one wants their child to be singled out. I would stress to Sarah's mom that she could really benefit from the services. I would assure her that all of the teachers participating in the program will be sensitive to Sarah's needs and will not purposefully single her out and make her feel bad. I would also introduce to Sarah's mom the fact Sarah may begin to enjoy school more once she is equipped with strategies to become a stronger reader. I would ask her to consider Sarah's future in this situation.
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Comments posted for this solution

Edward Gibbs
Edward Gibbs
Reps: 100
I would use this solution in my classroom. It is kind and caring yet addresses the issue at hand.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 8:14 pm

Brianne Blowers
Brianne Blowers
Reps: 102
I think putting the services into the most positive light will help the parent understand you care about the child and their academic success.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 9:21 pm

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Solution 4
Posted July 10, 2016 7:40 pm

juWuPe
juWuPe
Reps: 203
I would explain to her the help that her daughter would obtain from these programs and that she can be tested out whenever she improves.
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Solution 5
Posted February 28, 2015 10:53 pm

DequSu
DequSu
Reps: 22
I would absolutely detail exactly how Title 1 services work, and outline that labels such as "slow" are no longer tolerated in today's modern school system. Explaining to her how Title 1 will help her child and set her up for the future is a must.
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Comments posted for this solution

Natisha
Natisha
Reps: 99
I don't think this solution will help the teacher because the parent won't care about what Title I has to say, just what is best for their child.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 12:45 am

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