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Posted on February 24, 2017 2:42 am
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eZuGeQ
eZuGeQ
Reps: 200
Wants to talk to me in the middle of my lesson
In my internship classroom, I have a student that literally has a story for everything that I prepare a lesson on. She always wants to talk to me in the middle of my lessons and it gets the entire classroom off task. I have tried multiple times to dismiss her stories, by saying "Tell me after class", "We need to focus on this right now", and the often harsh "Does this have anything to do with what we are talking about in our lesson". She is on the autism spectrum and gets very upset when you redirect her back to the lesson. What do I do so I do not hurt this students feelings, as well as continue to discipline her so she is not constantly blurting out in the middle of my lessons?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 24, 2017 3:32 am

LuLyHa
LuLyHa
Reps: 226
I would try to encourage her to write her stories down instead of talking about them. This way, they can get her stories out without interrupting the entire class. If you are worried that this will distract the student from the lesson (and it likely will) I will remind her that she needs to raise her hand to speak or she will lose a privilege. You could also begin a point system with the student and every time she blurts out she loses a point, but if she raises her hand then she gets to earn a point. Once she gets to a designated number of points, she can pick a prize (a small toy, pen, free time, etc.). External rewards sometimes help to curb unwanted behaviors.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree with writing them down to share later.
  Posted on: March 6, 2017 4:09 am

SeQeLy
SeQeLy
Reps: 201
While I would also use a point system for this student, I am afraid that if the student writes her thoughts down she may miss valuable information.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 1:11 am

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Solution 2
Posted February 26, 2017 7:24 pm

eQeMeN
eQeMeN
Reps: 126
You can ask the student to write down any questions or comments she has on a piece of paper during the lesson and read it out loud for your attention once the lesson is over. It is also helpful with ASD students to prepare a social story depicting the appropriate behaviors during lessons. You could include directions on how to raise your hand, wait patiently to be called on, etc. I think silent signals are really useful, as well, when you're dealing with a student that may react emotionally to redirection.
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Solution 3
Posted February 26, 2017 2:12 am

uWuXyj
uWuXyj
Reps: 232
Try and talk to her before your lesson. Let her know what you will be teaching so that she can ask you questions then, before the lesson takes place. When she asks you all her questions and tells her stories, make sure she understands she needs to be quiet, but say it in a sweet way, like as much as I love talking to you we have to be fair and give the other students a chance to learn this stuff. If she talks, just remind her quickly of the talk you guys had earlier and hopefully this can work. If she stays quiet reward her or compliment her for her behavior, so hopefully it will continue.
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Solution 4
Posted February 27, 2017 12:54 am

Allyssa Straquadine
Allyssa Straquadine
Reps: 275
Have you tried speaking to the class as a whole before the lesson? I would perhaps before the lesson remind everyone that they need to raise their hand before speaking, and that you would like questions to be held till the end of the lesson unless it's really REALLY important.
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Solution 5
Posted February 27, 2017 1:13 am

Deborah Guyton
Deborah Guyton
Reps: 253
If the student speaks out during class, you could remind her that its your turn and when you are done, it will be her turn. She may have to be reminded regularly. You could also pretend to be so shocked that she interrupted you and tell her how it hurt your feelings and she may understand what you are trying to say better.
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Solution 6
Posted October 2, 2017 8:47 pm

uzebyn
uzebyn
Reps: 200
I think that allowing a stop and peer chat may be helpful. That way she can get it out. I also think that discussing in the beginning that you will have a discussion at the end will help. I would also tell them that writing down thoughts to talk about would be beneficial so they dont lose their thought.
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Solution 7
Posted October 4, 2017 12:58 am

sazaXa
sazaXa
Reps: 200
Can you use a "talking stick" in the classroom? The way it works is the only person who may talk is the person holding the stick. Or maybe you can give her a stack of sticky notes and tell her when she has a story or idea to share she writes it down and gives them to you at the end of the day. Tell her that once her stickies run out for the day, she is done, so she must use them wisely.
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Solution 8
Posted February 27, 2017 2:48 am

Hedese
Hedese
Reps: 202
I would remind students of the classroom rules about raising your hand before speaking and waiting until appropriate stopping points in the lesson where students can have the chance to ask questions that are related to the content.
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Solution 9
Posted July 9, 2017 5:58 pm

Elizabeth Allen
Elizabeth Allen
Reps: 209
Give the students time at the end of the lesson to ask any questions that don't directly relate to the topics. Explain that it is okay ask questions throughout the lesson but be mindful of interesting
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Solution 10
Posted October 4, 2017 8:41 pm

uSaPeL
uSaPeL
Reps: 201
It's funny, I'm have a very similar type of student in my internship right now. If he gets going, he could tell a story for the next 15 minutes. Some solutions that my teacher implements are having him draw his stories or anything that he feels like sharing. She also has him sitting right up close next to her because my teacher had told him she wants him to listen very carefully whenever there is a lesson going on because the student is her 'special helper'. Having them feel involved is important!
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Solution 11
Posted October 5, 2017 10:38 pm

vaHyna
vaHyna
Reps: 125
The idea of writing her stories down is a good idea, but to help her focus on the lesson and her to stop talking maybe you should have some sort of gesture that gets her to stop talking. Like once she starts talking have some sort of hand gesture or something to let her know to stop talking. You give that a try and see if that works.
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Solution 12
Posted October 7, 2017 1:09 pm

ereTuB
ereTuB
Reps: 202
I have a place where students can post thoughts and ideas that aren't directly related to the lesson. They write them down, put them on a board, and I look at the board and address them at an appropriate time. I have found this to be helpful with my students who do the same thing.
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Solution 13
Posted October 9, 2017 1:30 am

Travis Cannon
Travis Cannon
Reps: 211
i would tell the class as a whole that we are here to learn and today we have much to cover so please no interruptions today.
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Solution 14
Posted July 8, 2018 6:37 pm

Jeanette Jenkins
Jeanette Jenkins
Reps: 103
To show that you care about her questions and stories, talk to her before the lesson. Let her know what it's about and she can talk to you then. Let her know she has to listen in class without interrupting.
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Solution 15
Posted October 3, 2018 1:47 am

DuTepy
DuTepy
Reps: 201
I would kindly remind her of the class rules: no talking when the teacher is talking, and the consequences for breaking the rules. If she has a story to tell you she could also be given a sticky note to write on to remind her what her story is and to save it for after class. She might keep interrupting because she thinks she will forget and wants your attention.
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Solution 16
Posted October 8, 2017 11:10 pm

eBenyL
eBenyL
Reps: 101
Ask the parents if this is an issue they face with the student at home and take advice from the parents, maybe they can direct you to a method that helps
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Solution 17
Posted February 27, 2017 2:44 pm

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
I would provide this student with a copy of the lesson as well as an activity to fill out as the lesson goes on. This would encourage her to be quiet and listen so that she can fill out her worksheet. If she completes the worksheet and does not interrupt for 5 lessons, I would allow her to earn the chance to not have an activity for the next lesson.
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Solution 18
Posted February 27, 2017 2:51 am

beTyZa
beTyZa
Reps: 201
I love the idea of having this student write down her thoughts instead talking about them. I think this is the best way to express her thoughts and feelings and it lets the student still have a voice. You will be able to read her thoughts later and acknowledge them.
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Solution 19
Posted February 27, 2017 2:11 am

Gytusa
Gytusa
Reps: 205
Maybe have the student placed in a different classroom where she will not get off task so much.
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