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Posted on February 24, 2017 3:29 am
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usudaX
usudaX
Reps: 226
EBD Behavior Management System
I have seen a lot of different behavior management systems utilized in classrooms. The school in which I frequently work has a school-wide 'clip chart' system. While this is effective in the general education classrooms, it holds little meaning to the students in the K-4 EBD room. The biggest struggle that I see faced with this particular group of students is their lack of family involvement and consequences at home. Involving parents in the situations has done little to no help thus far. Most of the time, involving administration does little help, as they come back with candy or rewards for 'calming down.' All of this combined leaves the behavior management strictly up to the teacher with very little outside help.

My question is, what behavior management strategies have you seen implemented that have shown great success, especially in an elementary EBD setting?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 24, 2017 4:23 am

Lynn Krivoruchka
Lynn Krivoruchka
Reps: 295
My internships teacher last fall-spring had an EBD student in her ESE class. How she did this was, she became close to her. It would be hard to do this, if most of the students have EBD. She became close to the student and because of this, the student preformed better in the classroom. She gave her a nickname so the student would feel welcomed and asked how her day was when she entered in the room, so she felt like she was wanted there, since we know the parents were not that involved.

Hopefully this helps.
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nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
This is actually a current problem I am having in a class I am interning at. I have no solutions myself, but it seems as if the administration is not handling it well. As you said, offering rewards to the students just for calming down seems like an incentive for their bad behavior. I would really appreciate more feed back from people on this.
  Posted on: February 25, 2017 5:56 pm

nydyra
nydyra
Reps: 202
This is actually a current problem I am having in a class I am interning at. I have no solutions myself, but it seems as if the administration is not handling it well. As you said, offering rewards to the students just for calming down seems like an incentive for their bad behavior. I would really appreciate more feed back from people on this.
  Posted on: February 25, 2017 5:57 pm

yLeBun
yLeBun
Reps: 200
candy rewards are not effective tools for behavior modification.
  Posted on: February 25, 2017 10:40 pm

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I think that is an excellent solution.
  Posted on: March 6, 2017 4:03 am

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Solution 2
Posted February 25, 2017 10:36 pm

yLeBun
yLeBun
Reps: 200
The most appropriate strategies that I have implemented have been successful have all been work for reward based systems. You complete assignments, follow instructions and do not disturb other classmates you will receive rewards like ipad time, I try to stay away from candy rewards.
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Solution 3
Posted February 27, 2017 12:43 am

Allyssa Straquadine
Allyssa Straquadine
Reps: 275
One solution may be to implement a system in the class that rewards good, compassionate behavior. Something besides candy. Perhaps try a "citizenship" award and select different students each week that have shown superb behavior. I do not have personal experience with this exact situation and I am not teaching in a classroom yet, so I cannot speak from experience, but this might be worth a try.
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Solution 4
Posted February 27, 2017 12:46 am

Allyssa Straquadine
Allyssa Straquadine
Reps: 275
Another solution, kind of piggy-backing off of what someone else said, is forming a trusting relationship wth the students. Students will do amazing things for the teachers they love especially if they feel genuinely cared about by the teacher. Once I was observing an ESE teacher with a very violent student, and she was the only teacher in the whole department that could cal this student down when she had a fit. She told me that trust is like a bank account, and every time you greet a student, ask them how their day is going, or are just genuinely polite to them, you're putting money in the account And hopefully, during the times when they need to be disciplined, the account will not go negative. I hope that makes sense. It made perfect sense to me when she said it.
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Solution 5
Posted July 10, 2017 6:38 pm

uReZyW
uReZyW
Reps: 101
I agree with the other reviewers. I think if you build a relationship with your student things can get better. I have worked with students that show behavior problems every day. Many of them respond really good when you have a relationship with them, they want to make you proud and happy. But let's face it, others students have been so abused in their life that they do not trust anyone, they might not even want to build a relationship with the teachers. I think the reward system for theses students can work really good.
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Solution 6
Posted February 26, 2017 2:22 am

aZunet
aZunet
Reps: 100
Sometimes with the lack of parent involvement, once the parent isn't involved the student doesn't see the point of their parents in the school setting. in this class, the teacher has to be like the parent but also the teacher. So the teacher must find a happy medium. the teacher must try a different management plan. one person I know used a stick with detachable stickers that can be used every day. they have x amount and when the behavior is good they keep the stickers which is equal to point which will have a reward system in the classroom or be applied at home.
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Solution 7
Posted February 24, 2018 9:14 pm

ePymyp
ePymyp
Reps: 201
What I like to do for these students is to not call out their names if there is a problem. For example, if everyone is sitting down except for the student with EBD, then I make a general class announcement for everyone to have a seat. If that does not work, then I keep repeating the same class announcement until the student understands that they need to have a seat. This takes the attention off of them by not singling them out.
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