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Posted on February 26, 2017 3:20 pm
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tygaBu
tygaBu
Reps: 201
Behavior Management Plan
I have a student in my internship who currently has a FBA and goals regarding talking back, staying off task, and explicit language. As part of the internship I have to create a classroom management plan and was set to work with this student. I began the activity on a day the student was on task and ready to work. However since that day his behavior has become not only worse but he has begun threatening violence. I feel like my original plan of having the student self monitor his progress and align it with teacher monitoring is no longer work as the student will take the correction as an attack. I have been warned that this student is prone to lashing out unannounced and when have brought up my concerns have been informed that his behavior has been 75% better than in years prior and do not want to have him regress. Does anyone know of any ideas how to work with this student on his behavior in a different way?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 27, 2017 12:31 am

Allyssa Straquadine
Allyssa Straquadine
Reps: 275
I have never been in this situation, so I cannot speak from personal experience, but I would personally try to form a bond with the student. Students will climb mountains for the teachers that truly care for them. I would build a trusting relationship with this student. There may be some underlying reasons or even triggers for this behavior, and you want this student to feel comfortable sharing their feelings with you. This way, you can either avoid triggers all together and de-escalate the situation when there is one. I think having an adult that this student feels genuinely cares about them will help them in the long run.
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Solution 2
Posted February 26, 2017 7:02 pm

eQeMeN
eQeMeN
Reps: 126
I would try to find out in what situations the student excels most and incorporate those kind of learning experiences in as much of his day as possible. Maybe you guys should sit one-on-one with each other and talk about boundaries, both yours and his. It also helps to agree on some silent signals with one another, so that when his misbehaviors occur, he will not feel singled out and feel the need to lash out. A meeting with his parents or caregivers would be a reasonable next step if these behaviors persist.
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yZanaJ
yZanaJ
Reps: 202
I would ask the teacher if you can speak with the behavior specialist and let them know you are doing this internship. I have a student who is not engaged at all. I am doing my behavior plan with him and the behavior specialist and my CT were great resources to try different options. Even letting your supervisor at school know your situation might be a good idea.
  Posted on: October 8, 2017 1:16 am

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Solution 3
Posted February 26, 2017 6:46 pm

Gytusa
Gytusa
Reps: 205
First off you should check with the teacher to see if the student has any behavioral or emotional disorders. If that is the case there are many different things you can work with. But I would try and help him understand that what he is doing will not help him in the future
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
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Communication with the teacher is the best option I agree.
  Posted on: March 6, 2017 3:58 am

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Solution 4
Posted February 27, 2017 2:33 pm

Breanna Bunnell
Breanna Bunnell
Reps: 201
I would separate the day into three different chunks: morning, early afternoon, and late afternoon. For each time frame, this student has the opportunity to earn x amount of points- lets say 10 points. Every time the student reaches 100 points, I would provide a type of reward- something that the student likes (favorite food, computer time, etc.). This system might work well for this particular student because he has three different opportunities to earn points. If he does not behave well in the morning, his whole day is not ruined, he still has opportunity to earn a full 20 more points that day.
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Solution 5
Posted March 5, 2017 3:58 am

Lynn Krivoruchka
Lynn Krivoruchka
Reps: 295
I would make sure that the student has no prior behavioral plans that have failed. If there have been plans I would work off of those to see what worked and what didn't work. You can also reach out to the parents to see if they have tried anything at home. What has worked and what hasn't.
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Solution 6
Posted October 4, 2017 12:49 am

sazaXa
sazaXa
Reps: 200
It sounds like you have been working hard and have a plan in place and it is important to remember that sometimes things get worse before they get better. The teacher I am interning with said about a student in her class that sounds similar that "He seems worse now because he is finally realizing he has rules that he must follow and that we are holding him to it, he will tire of his routine of acting out and then we will see him start to get better." I would continue what you are doing, and try to continue focusing on the positive things this student does as well as trying to form a bond with this student. Ask how their weekend was or sit at lunch and talk about things other than school.
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Solution 7
Posted October 5, 2017 2:11 am

vaHyna
vaHyna
Reps: 125
First of all, if the student keeps threatening violence, then you need to discuss that with the teacher. Violence in school is an extremely sensitive subject and should not be taken lightly. This is for the safety of both him and the other students and teachers. However, in terms of wanting to help with his overall behavior, along with avoiding triggers (like the one solution on this board discussed) do not give up on the student. He will gain respect for you he knows you are there for him. Let him know you have high expectations for him and give him some small personal goals to work on and those small goals can become bigger goals over time. Just be patient with him and don;t give up.
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Solution 8
Posted February 27, 2017 2:41 am

beTyZa
beTyZa
Reps: 201
During this situation, I believe it might be helpful to pull this student aside and talk to him about what you can do to alleviate his stress/anger. If this does not help, set up a conference with his parents and try to create a plan that both you and the parents can implement.
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