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Posted on April 18, 2013 6:55 pm
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eWaPyH
eWaPyH
Reps: 100
New ESOL student
I have a new student in my class. His family speaks Spanish and almost no English. He desperately wants to learn English, but refuses to speak Spanish. His family moves around a lot, and last year he was in Cuba. This is his first year in a public school that he is actually attending every day. He is in the process of being entered into the ESOL program. In the time being, he is reading at a D reading level (based on Running Record testing that ranges from A-Z. His classmates are at J and above.) During full class instruction, he refuses to complete the assignments. During small group, he will complete at least 80% of the work. What methods do I use to engage him in the classwork? All of his books are at his reading level, but it is a Kindergarten reading level.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted April 18, 2013 7:17 pm

Ashley Dellane
Ashley Dellane
Reps: 75
I would incorporate strategies like TPR, read alouds, matching games (English word and corresponding picture), sentence strips, and Reader's Theater to build his confidence in completing assignments and assist him in learning the English language. Definitely modify the assignments and lessons to fit the needs of this student. Have him continue to work in small groups, but also pull him aside to work with him individually. In small groups, assign a buddy that can help him complete his work. Make assignments more fun for him, and include lots of pictures.
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Brianne Blowers
Brianne Blowers
Reps: 102
I agree with utilizing these ESOL strategies to help this student.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 8:14 pm

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Solution 2
Posted April 18, 2013 7:39 pm

Ms. Montana
Ms. Montana
Reps: 132
I would try talking to the student. The moment you find out you are getting an ESOL student in your class or for instance this situation make the student feel welcome. Encourage a positive and welcome environment for the student to feel comfortable in the unfamiliar class environment. Encourage the other classmates to be your "little helpers" to welcome the student's culture into their setting and be eager to get to know more about him. Also, if possible try placing the student with a peer that perhaps have a similar background. Another strategy could be to seek resources and advice from an ESOL teacher.
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ryZuSa
ryZuSa
Reps: 99
The most important thing to help ESOL students valued and respected in a general classroom is utilizing appropriate strategies to help assist their understanding and comprehension of instruction. This might include visual aids, video support, normal paced speech, avoidance of slang, as well as offering rich opportunities for these students to practice their own English production.
  Posted on: April 18, 2013 7:45 pm

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Solution 3
Posted March 13, 2015 5:58 pm

ByHuSu
ByHuSu
Reps: 102
My first year teaching was at a school with refugees from countries in South America, Asia, and Africa. Almost the entire population was ESOL, leading me to seek an ESOL certification.
My biggest piece of advice would be to research SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol). SIOP activities are geared for ELL students, but they are wonderful for ALL students. It promotes active engagement, makes ELL students feel comfortable and valued, and can be adapted to fit literally any subject or topic of the curriculum.
Some activities my students particularly enjoyed were the snowball fight and inner/outer circle activities.

The website is www.siop.org. I would also seek out professional learning in this area locally and see if you can find something. If not, look in to webinars.
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Solution 4
Posted October 6, 2016 5:40 pm

PuWupe
PuWupe
Reps: 206
I understand your situation, my younger brother was eager to learn the language as soon as we landed to this country, and as your student, my bother did refuse to speak our home-language.
Your student seems to be more engaged during small groups because he may interact more with peers and he gets to understand what is going on with assignments. I will suggest that during full class instruction, he get pair up with a peer to complete the activity at the time.
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Solution 5
Posted July 8, 2018 10:04 pm

ehaJaT
ehaJaT
Reps: 100
This is really tough and I hope that when he is placed in ESOL things get drastically better. He can do the work when motivated. I'm sure he has had trouble finding safe places in the past that allowed him to open up and acquire information and language.
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Solution 6
Posted October 3, 2017 9:55 pm

aNaMeJ
aNaMeJ
Reps: 201
Maybe giving him books and things to read that he finds interesting will help engage is interest! In English of course to help him learn!
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Solution 7
Posted April 18, 2013 7:42 pm

Lili G
Lili G
Reps: 127
I would definitely tell the student that in order for him to learn English, he needs to try his best to participate in class discussions and assignments. I would also see if maybe a one-on-one or small group instruction would help him increase his reading skills. I would also suggest an advocate or ESOL teacher to speak with his parents in order to have a good communication system going. Some specific ESOL strategies can include TPR (total physical response), reading aloud, and sentence strips.
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