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Posted on October 2, 2017 11:21 pm
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Yeilin Ramirez
Yeilin Ramirez
Reps: 200
Best Friends
In the class I am mentoring, I have three students who I have to work with everyday after school. Two out of three of my mentees are best friends and are constantly talking in their native language. I have tried seating them farther from one another when we all work together, or having me or the third student sit between them. The teacher of the class knows they talk a lot, but only tells me to address it myself.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 5, 2017 12:56 am

vaHyna
vaHyna
Reps: 125
I am a mentor as well and some of the students I work with in group like to talk in their native language and goof off. So, I know what you're going through. However, I just break up the talking and they will listen and the teacher is on it as well. This is defiantly a tough one though since you tried pretty much all the solutions possible and they are not working, also the teacher is not helping you. I would say defiantly try to have a talk with the teacher about it in private. Ask him or her something like "this talking is getting out of hand and I have tried everything to prevent it, but they are not listening. Should I start taking privileges away or something if they keep doing this?"
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Solution 2
Posted October 3, 2017 4:45 pm

GyNyzu
GyNyzu
Reps: 200
This is a tough one ! Your actions seem like you have hit all the obvious solutions. I think it is time to show them who the boss is , sorry . Give them a warning, possible say " you are going to loose a privilege" computer work , art , iPad time. Make sure the teacher is on board with what your game plan is. There was an teacher who would say " you have 1 min, 2 ..... and the student knew he/she would have to sit out of recess for that much time. It worked!
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rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
Right. You need the let the student know you are the authority figure.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:26 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 3, 2017 10:34 pm

aNaMeJ
aNaMeJ
Reps: 201
This is hard because you don't want to be offensive to their native language but enough is enough. Give the students consequences when they talk too much or disrupt. Class time is for learning, not talking with your friends. Tell them that is okay during free time, etc.
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Solution 4
Posted October 4, 2017 7:04 pm

uSaPeL
uSaPeL
Reps: 201
I think it's time to crack down on these students and bring on the mentality of 'enough is enough'. I would be stern with the kids and show them you have the authority over them. Offer up consequences and tell them you will do something if they continue to be disruptive because your time is just as valuable.
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Solution 5
Posted October 6, 2017 6:30 pm

usaWaZ
usaWaZ
Reps: 202
For this problem I would implement the classroom consequences. In my classroom they get to warnings, they get moved, then if they still don't stop they get dojo points taken away and if they still don't stop they get sent to another classroom with a note home to the parents. If none of these things are working the teacher should step up and help you.
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Solution 6
Posted October 8, 2017 11:28 pm

raMaba
raMaba
Reps: 201
I think that actually giving them 5 minutes to talk after your lesson is complete can help but only in the sense that you get your lesson done. Let them know that as long as work gets done, you will allow them to talk. If it doesn't get done, then they don't get their socializing time. That way they will be plugged in more if they know they have a chance to talk at the end if they stay focused. Also, maybe start the day out with asking them how their weekend was, what they had/having for lunch, what their favorite part of the day is so far, and what they are looking forward to if the weekend is nearby. Opening up conversation for a little before the lesson starts might help too.
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Solution 7
Posted October 8, 2017 5:42 pm

yZanaJ
yZanaJ
Reps: 202
Start by having one or the other work with the third student and one work with you. Then I would individually talk to them and let them know that the class is for learning and the talking can take place afterward. I think you tried great solutions but sometime divide and conquer works best.
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Solution 8
Posted October 8, 2017 11:02 pm

eBenyL
eBenyL
Reps: 101
I think maybe directly telling the girls that they are being a distraction and asking them to talk during breaks, recess, and lunch could help.
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Solution 9
Posted October 3, 2017 11:19 pm

sazaXa
sazaXa
Reps: 200
In the class I am working in, there are a couple groups of very chatty students and no matter how we separate them, they find another group to chat with. Ways we have tried to work around this is by allowing them to work in pairs if they can complete their work. They know now that if their work isn't finished, they will lose privileges to work together at all and we will move the desks back into rows which is fun for no one.
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Solution 10
Posted October 8, 2017 1:12 am

pujyvu
pujyvu
Reps: 100
You need to out your hands down tell them that if they are not going to listen then there will be consequences
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Solution 11
Posted October 9, 2017 2:45 am

useZyt
useZyt
Reps: 207
I would suggest playing music while they work so they cannot talk. Or placing one of them in a different classroom until they understand that talking is not allowed.
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Solution 12
Posted October 9, 2017 1:11 am

vugage
vugage
Reps: 201
I would ask the student to speak english in the classroom. I would say if they want to speak their native language at recess or at lunch that is fine but in the classroom I need to know what you are saying.
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uDyJeZ
uDyJeZ
Reps: 203
They may be speaking their native language to help them with the work, asking them to speak English only is not respectful of their language.
  Posted on: October 8, 2018 1:59 am

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Solution 13
Posted October 13, 2017 2:35 am

Xaparu
Xaparu
Reps: 201
I would try to talk to the parents to see if they can stay after school on different days to make sure they are getting the help that they need without one another.
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Solution 14
Posted February 23, 2018 9:42 pm

Kenneth Allen
Kenneth Allen
Reps: 101
I would address the issue with the students and the teacher. I would take my complaint to the principal for some type of support between you and the teacher on that issue.
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Solution 15
Posted February 24, 2018 8:57 pm

ePymyp
ePymyp
Reps: 201
Are these students in the ESOL program? If so, I would encourage them to use English as much as possible during instruction. This will help them not only learn English, but will help them gain more friends in the classroom. Maybe in the long run, this solution will cause them to not talk so much to each other and be more comfortable with other peers in the class, thus causing a balance in the amount of talking they do throughout the day.
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Solution 16
Posted February 25, 2018 3:27 pm

Sieara Voegtle
Sieara Voegtle
Reps: 202
Remind students of their purpose for being mentored and give consequences if it continues to occur. Ultimately if the behavior continues the girls may need to be mentored at different times to ensure they are benefiting from your service to them.
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Solution 17
Posted February 26, 2018 3:39 am

ydeZuj
ydeZuj
Reps: 101
I would try to pull the girls out of their bff-ness by relating the lesson to something that would interest all three of the students and try to brake down that wall
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Solution 18
Posted February 26, 2018 5:03 am

veXyge
veXyge
Reps: 196
Do not always try to separate them. Give a little and make sure you have high expectations for those students.
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