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Posted on October 9, 2017 2:23 am
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aXejeG
aXejeG
Reps: 102
Aggressive Behavior
In a class I was an intern for, a student would get random bursts of anger in which he would flip his desk, storm out of the room, or throw books. This behavior was posing a threat to other students, so the teacher isolated the student's desk permanently and sent the student to the counselor. Time and time again, the behavior persisted. Personally, I think the child has some sort of anger management issues, but there is nothing the educator can do solely. What would be the next appropriate action?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 15, 2017 1:10 pm

pehuby
pehuby
Reps: 126
I believe that these kinds of issues might be out of a teachers hands. This student might have some underlying issues that need to be addressed by parents and a therapist. The next I believe that needs to be taken is a parent conference and with an administrator. The last thing anyone wants to do is endanger the other students with his outbursts.
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uJyGep
uJyGep
Reps: 200
The safety of the class is first and foremost.
  Posted on: February 21, 2018 6:10 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 16, 2017 2:15 am

ReLeve
ReLeve
Reps: 103
Sometimes this is a indicator of some kind of Learning Disability. I have a first grader like this who will have fits of anger when he does not get to make the decisions while we are doing work. I am an aide and the first thing I asked for was if he did or did not have an IEP. IEPs are programs written for children with learning disabilities that explains what is going on and how to handle the situation! Anyone working with the child has a right to access the IEP and is in fact encouraged to do so. Also do not underestimate the power of positive reinforcement. A lot of the times this disruptive and aggressive behavior is a cry for attention. Simply do your best to ignore the negative behavior and reward as often and excessively as you can when he does something he is asked to do. Even if it is something as simple as sitting in his seat, praise him and let him know he is doing well! This will encourage the student to want to participate and do what he is asked to do. If the problem persists, perhaps a parent teacher conference will help. After all, no one knows the child better than their parent(s)!
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uJyGep
uJyGep
Reps: 200
The behavior could be indicative of something such as a LD.
  Posted on: February 21, 2018 6:11 pm

WeDyje
WeDyje
Reps: 100
I agree with this solution
  Posted on: July 8, 2018 1:34 pm

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Solution 3
Posted February 21, 2018 6:10 pm

uJyGep
uJyGep
Reps: 200
I would flag the behavior and look into potentially finding appropriate intervention strategies. Bringing in the parents, administrators and counselors could help in figuring out the root of the child's bursts of aggression. A plan should be made to promote classroom safety and help the student deviate from these behaviors.
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Solution 4
Posted October 13, 2017 2:17 am

Xaparu
Xaparu
Reps: 201
I would talk to the teacher that usually teaches that class to see if she notices it too. I would then maybe do the research to see if you can see what that student has. He or she might have a type of disability and need extra attention that they are not getting in that class.
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Solution 5
Posted February 21, 2018 12:43 am

tuBaZu
tuBaZu
Reps: 200
It needs to be noted of when these outbursts occur to see if there is a pattern. It could indicate a learning disability like a previous comment stated but could also reflect at home issues and poor coping mechanisms. If you know the students parents are divorced with shared custody, know their schedule and see if it occurs on a switching day or close to. Coping mechanisms are not always taught, giving the student an area they can go to to express themselves may also help. Allowing them to take breaks and to communicate that they feel on edge before exploding can also be helpful. Limited attention during outburst is also a good thing, take the proper safety precautions and discipline the child but do not bring extra attention to the behavior. Contact the parents and ask for their cooperation and involvement, having their number to quickly dial during an incident can help calm the child down.
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Solution 6
Posted February 22, 2018 8:00 pm

yharum
yharum
Reps: 102
i would speak to the students parents about what is going on and try to come up with a solution with them. The student may need to be put on medication for his anger problems. I would also try and talk to the student about what is making him angry and see if you could give him some advice.
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Solution 7
Posted February 24, 2018 3:23 am

ePymyp
ePymyp
Reps: 201
Looks like this type of behavior needs to be documented by the teacher. If this behavior continues, this student may be on track for a behavior intervention plan. Over time as data builds up (through tier one to three) this student may become eligible for a plan that can help them! Until then, walking the students out of the room, lining them up in the hall, staying with the problem students, and calling administration for backup is the temporary solution.
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Solution 8
Posted February 19, 2018 10:10 pm

yzujyV
yzujyV
Reps: 198
Try asking the teacher to talk to the student individually to find out why the child is constantly acting out aggressively. If this does not work, contact the parents and find out if there is something going on at home that may be causing the behavior.
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Solution 9
Posted October 9, 2017 2:40 am

useZyt
useZyt
Reps: 207
I think as the intern you can't take many actions. I would suggest talking to the teacher about placing that student in an EBD classroom. They might get a better education in an environment that they can stay calm in.
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Solution 10
Posted February 25, 2018 1:25 am

Nicole McVey
Nicole McVey
Reps: 201
I would monitor what the student's trigger(s) are and set to discover why the student is truly upset... is it something outside of school or in school? Find out whether it is truly something you can help or not since the counselor doesn't seem to be effective. Teachers have a more impactful relationship with their students if they choose to. Then, I would implement some kind of individualized behavior management plan where each period the student and teacher rate how the student's behavior was and if they maintain 4 out of 6 periods (or whatever school has) than they receive an appropriate reward that they have a some say in choosing. Use as many positive supports as possible, but do not ignore the reasons why or the type of behavior. Be sure to monitor and record all behaviors, the environment, subject, etc.
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Solution 11
Posted February 25, 2018 4:53 pm

uHubaT
uHubaT
Reps: 202
I would create a "break desk" that has different puzzles and coloring books for the students to calm down. I would explain to the student that whenever he/she gets upset that he/she can take a 2 minute break to calm down before resuming activities.
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Solution 12
Posted February 26, 2018 12:16 am

aTaqyW
aTaqyW
Reps: 202
The next step would be to contact the parents and administration to have a meeting together about possible solutions for this behavior. Applied Behavior Analysis is a great option for the student to be conditioned out of those behaviors or maybe just seeing a psychologist regularly would help eliminate or diminish the undesired behavior.
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Solution 13
Posted October 1, 2018 6:01 pm

quJuja
quJuja
Reps: 201
This sounds like it is out of your hands. The child sounds like he may have emotional behavior disorder, but you cannot just diagnose a student and say this. The teacher will have to document everything that occurs, along with staff in the school. Communicate with parents to make sure they know what is going on. The student will probably have to be tested and the school IEP team will probably have to take the next step from there to see if the child needs special services.
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Solution 14
Posted February 20, 2018 12:40 am

Shelby Farrell
Shelby Farrell
Reps: 206
I've seen this happen in a school I interned at. The only thing they could do was remove the student from the school, after all, he was a danger to himself and others.
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