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Posted on October 9, 2017 2:36 am
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aXejeG
aXejeG
Reps: 102
Purposefully Being Disobedient
In a class I was an intern for, there was a young boy who would purposefully not follow directions given. For example, when told to create a poem with a drawing, the student wrote a poem and turned it in with no drawing. The teacher asked the boy to create a drawing, and about one minute later, the boy came back with pencil scribbles all over the paper. Mind you, this student has plenty of his artwork on the wall (along with his other classmates) and seemed to be in a hurry throughout this behavior. The teacher let him know the drawing must be done with the supplied crayons and must represent his poem. Finally, he turned in a beautiful assignment. What do you think could be causing this behavior and why?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 9, 2017 5:19 am

SeQeLy
SeQeLy
Reps: 201
For this student, I would refrain from giving attention to negative behaviors and make sure to praise the positive ones..in this case following directions. I think that the teacher's reminder of the directions is a good simple solution as well.
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Solution 2
Posted October 9, 2017 2:53 am

useZyt
useZyt
Reps: 207
I think maybe he just needed a little extra attention. He may not be getting attention at home, so he does things at school that will get him noticed by the teacher. You may need to just check in with him every so often to see how he is doing throughout class.
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yJuhuv
yJuhuv
Reps: 100
If I were in this situation, I would exactly do this.
  Posted on: October 14, 2018 4:05 am

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Solution 3
Posted October 16, 2017 2:06 am

ReLeve
ReLeve
Reps: 103
I have a first grader who does this. I find the best solution is to find subjects that get him excited (for him he absolutely loves trains) so I will let him (and the other students!) base the project or subject when appropriate around things that make them happy or excited. I find motivation and positive reinforcement work best in these situations! Do NOT give any attention at all to the negative behavior. Instead, redirect the attention, and ask calmly for them to try again. Usually what the child wants is attention, so try to give them attention in a positive way that will make them want to participate and listen in the future.
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Solution 4
Posted February 20, 2018 10:39 pm

uDaHeD
uDaHeD
Reps: 200
I had a student like this and one thing that I found helpful was giving them a bit of extra attention BEFORE the negative behavior can start. When they start the assignment, ask them what they're creating, what they're thinking, etc. If you say you're going to check back up on the work, do it! Stay in touch with them and make sure they know you're interested. Someones just that little bit of extra expectation and attention helps them focus. Good luck!
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Solution 5
Posted February 25, 2018 5:07 pm

Nicole McVey
Nicole McVey
Reps: 201
I would discourage that behavior by encouraging the student's strengths like if the teacher knows that student is artistic or can draw good pictures tell them that they should take their time, re-read the directions, and encourage them that you know they can produce a better drawing and they didn't give their full effort. Once the student turned in that completed properly you must praise and say, see look how good! It just might be the best you've ever drawn or really emphasize how proud you are. I think the behavior could be caused by not receiving enough encouragement or positive praise. I know I am more productive and happy to work for a teacher who notices my efforts and makes me feel good about my work, otherwise, a teacher that never thanks or praises I do not want to do the assignment and find them annoying.
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Solution 6
Posted February 21, 2018 12:14 am

tuBaZu
tuBaZu
Reps: 200
I think the teacher handled the situation well. They handed the work back and told the student the expectations again. They allowed time to finish and supplied the tools to. If the student had refused to redo/complete the assignment then other measures could have taken place but the behavior was corrected. If the behavior continues then I would start by sending the parents a short note or simple phone call explaining the behavior.
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Solution 7
Posted February 22, 2018 9:18 pm

yharum
yharum
Reps: 102
giving him positive feedback when he does a good job should be helpful, just continue to make sure he does his best he seems to just be wanting the attention.
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Solution 8
Posted February 25, 2018 4:44 pm

uHubaT
uHubaT
Reps: 202
It is possible that the student is looking for attention and direction. I would state the expectations for the assignment before they start, and I would tell them that the assignment will not be accepted until all components have been fully completed.
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Solution 9
Posted February 25, 2018 11:31 pm

qeguve
qeguve
Reps: 200
A solution for this could be to write the directions fully on the board so that students could reference them on the board later if they need to. The teacher could then remind the students to check the board before turning in their assignments to make sure they have all of the expected work completed in the correct way.
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Solution 10
Posted October 1, 2018 5:59 pm

quJuja
quJuja
Reps: 201
Always reward the positive behavior and try not to give negative behaviors attention. In this case, if you know the student will do this each time an assignment is given, before letting that child start the assignment check in with that child and make sure they understand the directions. Verbalize what he will do and get ideas, the student will have no room to say he did not understand.
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Solution 11
Posted October 5, 2018 5:26 pm

yGapeW
yGapeW
Reps: 202
I would start with positive praise. It sounds like this student is in need of attention. Start with positive praise when you are walking around the room while they are working on the assignment. If it's as bad as it seems, maybe even reward with stickers for following the directions. From there i would pull him aside and let him know what the expectations are
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Solution 12
Posted October 6, 2018 4:59 am

yNeruj
yNeruj
Reps: 200
It sounds like the student was in a hurry to finish their work. I have interned with students that had a coloring page or a book they got from the library and would much rather rush the assignment so that they can get back to their preferred activity. I feel that the teacher addressed the situation well. If it becomes too much of an issue, I would have the student place their book or coloring page in their backpack.
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Solution 13
Posted February 20, 2018 12:39 am

Shelby Farrell
Shelby Farrell
Reps: 206
Laziness. Just because a student can easily obey rules and achieve much in class, it doesn't mean they are going to at least TRY to take the easy way out.
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yJuhuv
yJuhuv
Reps: 100
I would never do this. This is wrong.
  Posted on: October 14, 2018 3:59 am

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Solution 14
Posted October 15, 2017 4:33 pm

pyJeZy
pyJeZy
Reps: 102
This is a strong case of needing parent involvment.
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