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Posted on October 10, 2017 1:55 am
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SeQeLy
SeQeLy
Reps: 201
Crying in the classroom
In a kindergarten classroom, one boy cries very often. He cries upon arrival and transitioning through the morning. He does not cry during centers, but when it is time to do CVC words at the carpet or table work he cries. I feel it is a means of escape or attention but the co-teacher will baby him into compliance. What could be done?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 13, 2017 2:00 am

Xaparu
Xaparu
Reps: 201
This sounds like to me he cries because he wants to escape a certain situation or get attention. This is a behavior that is really hard to break. I would not give in because hopefully he will get over it. At home he probably does the same thing and his parents give in to him. If it becomes a huge problem I would have a teacher parent conference with his parents to see what they think you should do.
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Solution 2
Posted October 15, 2017 1:11 pm

pehuby
pehuby
Reps: 126
It sounds as though he is looking for attention and the teacher is giving into it! I would stop babying him every time he cries. The first few times that you do this will be rough but after a while, the child will stop behaving this way when he realizes no one is going to baby him anymore.
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yzujyV
yzujyV
Reps: 198
If I were in this situation I would do exactly this. Teachers should not give into the crying.
  Posted on: February 19, 2018 9:54 pm

PeMuQa
PeMuQa
Reps: 200
I would add that the manner of correcting the behavior should be changed. Being firm and reminding them that this is not appropriate for school is not the same as babying, and if they understand that this behavior upsets the teachers, the student may stop.
  Posted on: February 26, 2018 3:32 am

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Solution 3
Posted November 8, 2017 10:37 pm

GyPame
GyPame
Reps: 9
It is definitely a means of escape. He is obviously struggling when it comes to school work. Since he cries when it is time to do CVC words, that makes me think he may have a reading disability. It would probably be beneficial to look into the root of the academic issue before assuming he wants attention.
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Solution 4
Posted February 25, 2018 1:16 am

Nicole McVey
Nicole McVey
Reps: 201
I have to say I was that student. I hated going to school, I had social engagement issues with peers, and I cried because I was just an emotional child. It could be for attention or it could be a complete disconnection from peers, teacher, and school altogether. The best way to know is to communicate with student and parents. This student may need more stimulation than others or involvement in his learning to help engage and keep him from getting upset or emotional. The student may not receive attention at home or may receive too much. You MUST find out the root of the problem before making assumptions!
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Solution 5
Posted October 16, 2017 12:36 am

eqeLeQ
eqeLeQ
Reps: 203
It seems like the student is crying for attention because he knows that the co-teacher is going to "baby" him. This is giving the student attention just like he wanted. Considering the crying only happens at certain parts of the day. I would try to contact the parent and possibly bring them in for a conference to discuss this issue.
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Solution 6
Posted February 25, 2018 2:36 am

JytuTe
JytuTe
Reps: 102
I would supply a morning coloring sheet of his favorite character when coming into class in the morning this may help with the transition. I would also create cards for the cvc words with his favorite character this may help with his focus and give him an incentive to try.
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Solution 7
Posted October 15, 2017 7:33 pm

yheGeS
yheGeS
Reps: 200
This is something that is definitely distracting inside the classroom, however this is probably something the student is doing at home as well. I would get ahold of the parents and hold a meeting with the student, and go from there.
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Solution 8
Posted February 22, 2018 8:21 pm

yharum
yharum
Reps: 102
you should talk to the co-teacher because babying him is making him think it is ok to do it and he knows he will get away with it. if he does not stop crying when it comes to doing the work then he needs to sit down and he will not be able to participate in the fun activities.
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Solution 9
Posted February 24, 2018 12:03 am

Ariel Brangers
Ariel Brangers
Reps: 102
I would have a conference with the parents to understand if the root of his behavior is due to the parents. Sometimes if the parents give in to the bad behavior, he will think the same will happen at school. I would try to ignore it or scold him for it. Maybe remove him from the group or make him do his own assignment.
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Solution 10
Posted February 24, 2018 3:12 am

ePymyp
ePymyp
Reps: 201
I have heard of a scenario like this before. It all depends on the child and how he or she reacts to different things. For example, I had a CT that had this problem in her classroom as well. She said that she tried everything (she was the most kind and caring teacher I ever met). What she ended up doing that worked was leave the child alone when this happened in order to help him collect himself and have think time. It only took him about two minutes to recuperate and rejoin the class.
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Solution 11
Posted February 25, 2018 10:18 pm

yTutar
yTutar
Reps: 200
I would try to motivate the student to participate by providing positive incentives that makes working seem more appealing than crying. I would consult your coteacher, parents, and the student himself to come up with a specific behavior management plan. Create specific goals, daily, weekly, and overall. Use rewards, consequences, and reinforcement to motivate him. Find out what motivates him most and use it as an incentive for participation. You can also use student interest to create engaging lessons that he wants to be a part of.
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Solution 12
Posted October 8, 2018 12:12 am

rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
I think it might be a good idea to meet with the parents and consult them about this issue. Maybe there are problems at home you are unaware of.
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Solution 13
Posted October 17, 2017 12:58 am

zuMyJe
zuMyJe
Reps: 100
I would alert the parents of the situation and talk with them and contact the schools guidance counselors.
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Solution 14
Posted October 15, 2017 9:16 pm

qyZeqa
qyZeqa
Reps: 101
Keep trying to get him to do the work and talk to the parents about his crying.
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Solution 15
Posted February 20, 2018 12:34 am

Shelby Farrell
Shelby Farrell
Reps: 206
Tough love. Use a firm voice and explain that there is nothing to cry about, and then change the topic to get his mind off of crying.
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