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Posted on April 18, 2013 7:20 pm
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eWaPyH
eWaPyH
Reps: 100
Behavior Problem
There is a lot going on here.

I have a female student I will name Tammy. She is a tomboy. She is the biggest (tallest) girl in the classroom. She is a bully. Mom told us at the last meeting that the reason her daughter misbehaves is because we do not ask her why she isn't smiling when she is in a bad mood. We have since tried this approach, but it doesn't work. When Tammy slips into her bad moods (mom claims she is ODD, bipolar, and ADHD), she will not come back out. During a math lesson she told me that I was stupid and I don't know how to teach and I don't know what I am talking about.

She is in RTI, LLI, and recently entered a behavior program to attempt to get the violent outbreaks under control. (On top of her verbal attacks, she has kicked at least one student every day for the past 2 weeks).

What else can be done to control Tammy in the classroom? The parents are fed up with the phone calls home and will only accept calls about illness. Tammy knows this and uses it to her advantage.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted April 25, 2013 10:34 pm

Sandee English
Sandee English
Reps: 100
I think I would speak with the RtI team to see what suggestions they may have since they are working with her, too. Next, I would implement my own behavior change program in addition to the one you mentioned since it is my classroom. I would continue to contact the parents as well. They did not have the option of dropping out; this is their daughter, and they will be kept informed and offered to make real suggestions of their own other than asking Tammy why she is not smiling. Lastly, I would make EVERY effort to proclaim from the mountains every single good thing Tammy does (part of my behavior change program) which might actually have an impact on how she relates to others.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree, use your resources.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:15 am

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Solution 2
Posted April 18, 2013 7:48 pm

VuVyRu
VuVyRu
Reps: 84
The first thing I would do is talk with the administration to develop a plan for what to do the next time she has one of her outbursts (such as sending her to a separate time-out area of just a different classroom). Second, I would ask Tammy about her behavior BEFORE she is in the bad mood, when she is calm and able to more clearly express her emotions. If you wait until she is in the bad mood, it seems like it is already too late to do much about it.
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erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
I think this is a great idea!
  Posted on: October 15, 2014 2:30 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 18, 2014 3:19 pm

SaDeTe
SaDeTe
Reps: 101
As previously stated, speaking with administration is key. Also, try to get on a personal level with Tammy to see if you can figure out her triggers. What happens before each time she acts out? See if there is a pattern and try to attempt to get rid of whatever may trigger her. On a personal level, talk with Tammy about solutions and rewards for controlling her behavior. Allow her to have a "time away" area if she feels she is about to have a moment. Have her give you a sign to show she needs to exit the room for a minute and go to her "time away" spot. I hope this helps!
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Solution 4
Posted April 18, 2013 7:46 pm

Ms. Montana
Ms. Montana
Reps: 132
It sounds as if Tammy is dealing with some problems, and sadly her parents are washing their hands of the problem. The first strategy I would do is to find out if Tammy has any other favorite subjects or teachers she is fond of at the school. Seek advice or encourage a sit down talk with Tammy from a person she respects may do some good. You can also try speaking with Tammy one on one. Next see the advise from the guidance counselor and suggest starting up the process to have Tammy being placed in a specialized class to help her behavior and physical outburst which are a constant distraction and disturbance in your class.
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Solution 5
Posted March 15, 2015 8:37 pm

yvyGyQ
yvyGyQ
Reps: 100
Sometimes its important to meet the student halfway. I would make Tammy believe that I understand her even if I have no clue. When I had to deal with difficult students in the past this have worked.
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