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Posted on October 2, 2012 3:24 pm
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uNaBeZ
uNaBeZ
Reps: 131
Student is disruptive in Class
I teach in a class where students have me for a Reading, Writing, and Civics teacher and my colleague for Math and Science. We have a student who is very disruptive in class and often talks about things that are not on topic. Our class sits in groups of four, some groups have five; he is the fifth student in a group. Not only is my colleague getting upset with his behaviors, his classmates are, too. I have tried proximity, eye contact, and reminding the student that he is not on topic to discourage his negative comments, but he persist.

Do you have any suggestions in dealing with him? My colleague wants to move him to a self-contained ESE classroom because he is too disruptive. He has a 504 plan, but his parents deny he has any issues. I am trying to combat this for the sake of the child, while maintaining a positive learning environment for all.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 2, 2012 3:31 pm

Ashlyn Eddinger
Ashlyn Eddinger
Reps: 121
I would deal with this situation by talking to the student in a one-on-one setting. It is important to put yourself in the student’s shoes to try to see what their motivation is, what would cause them to be disruptive, or have this problem or issue. I would also have the student come up with ways that they would resolve this issue. This will make them have some ownership. The last thing I would do is make sure that I listen carefully. Ask clarifying questions that help to define the issue. “I want to make certain that I understand what you are saying is this what you mean?”
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree with your solution.
  Posted on: February 24, 2018 7:00 am

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Solution 2
Posted December 3, 2012 8:56 pm

Melissa Tolbert
Melissa Tolbert
Reps: 104
I also agree that conferencing with the student would be a great way to begin to understand where the student is coming from and what the motivations might be behind the disruptive behaviors.I would also observe and note the behaviors and their timing throughout the day. Are there any patterns? Is this something he might be doing for attention? Noticing any consistencies can help determine the student's motivation and how you can accommodate his needs. If it is perhaps for attention, one thing to do is to comment on the students who are doing something correctly and give them verbal praise when the student is acting out. This will shift the attention from him and to the students who are following directions. As for the parents, if they continue to disagree with what is happening in the classroom, I would start a log of all of the negative behaviors with when and what occurred. This would be great data for them and any other intervention plans you might want to set in place.
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Solution 3
Posted October 2, 2012 3:51 pm

GeJese
GeJese
Reps: 116
I would try to move him to a smaller group of 4 students instead of having him be the 5th member. I would also try to redirect the conversation back to the topic when he starts to ramble. I think I would go over the classroom rules and explain that I am not going to listen to anyone who has not raised their hand silently and waited until they have gotten permission to speak. I have seen this work before for some students.
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Solution 4
Posted October 2, 2012 3:52 pm

GeJese
GeJese
Reps: 116
I would try to move him to a smaller group of 4 students instead of having him be the 5th member. I would also try to redirect the conversation back to the topic when he starts to ramble. I think I would go over the classroom rules and explain that I am not going to listen to anyone who has not raised their hand silently and waited until they have gotten permission to speak. I have seen this work before for some students.
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Solution 5
Posted October 5, 2012 9:54 am

amaJud
amaJud
Reps: 114
I would conference with this student and see if there is something else going on that the other teacher or myself are not seeing while we are teaching. If the student seems to be fine them I will draw up a contract with him so he is aware of the rules he needs to follow. After we have discussed different problems and he agrees to the contract I would ask my colleague to come in and conference with the student so the child is aware that these rule apply for his class as well.
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Solution 6
Posted October 9, 2012 8:41 am

ynudaq
ynudaq
Reps: 121
I would move the student to a section by himself near the teacher's desk. I would also use a reward system to help the student form a possitive behavior and try to slowly get rid of this negative behavior. If this still did not work I would conference with the parents.
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Solution 7
Posted October 12, 2012 5:15 pm

Courtney Morra
Courtney Morra
Reps: 118
It may be helpful to give the students a couple of minutes of cool down time where you give them 2-5 minutes of talk time so that they can get it out of their systems.
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Solution 8
Posted October 13, 2012 5:37 pm

vemybu
vemybu
Reps: 119
It may be time to step up the consequences. Although talking out isn't a big deal if it happens occasionally, but if it is continuous then something needs to be done. You can try moving him by himself, sending him to another classroom, detention, or even referral. When his parents realize that the problem is more serious they may talk to him or work with you to find a solution.
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Solution 9
Posted October 16, 2012 9:24 am

NaZyde
NaZyde
Reps: 115
Why not move him into a smaller group or let him work in a pair? It is possible that he is seeking attention.
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Solution 10
Posted November 4, 2012 4:48 pm

RyruNe
RyruNe
Reps: 86
Even though this student has a 504 plan, I do not see any need to recommend him for a self-contained ESE class. There a multiple strategies you as the teacher can use to get this student on track. One way you could see if the student may work differently under different circumstances is to switch up your groups. Instead of having groups of four, and some groups of five, you could re-work the groups to make a majority of the groups contain five students and have one group of three or four students. This student could then be placed in this smaller group with students who he might be more compatible with. A smaller group with different students could even end up putting him a position where he could take a lead role in the group, instead of just being an “extra.” I feel it is also important to conference with this student, even before contacting his parents, to maybe dig deeper into why he is having issues with staying on task and what is causing his inattention. After gaining an understanding of what is going on with your student, you could create a private behavioral contract with him where both of you come up with solutions to improve his behavior, incentives for following this contract, and consequences for when he does not comply. He then needs to understand that this applies not only to you, but to the co-teacher as well and the same rules and consequences apply. After you have communicated with your student, then contact his parents and let them know what you have discussed with him. Inform them of the behavioral contract you came up with together, what they can do to help reinforce this contract and appropriate behavior, and what to expect if he does not follow the conditions of the contract. This way all parties know what to expect and everyone can be held accountable.
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Solution 11
Posted December 9, 2012 7:07 pm

Shankeil Tarver
Shankeil Tarver
Reps: 116
The teacher should talk to the student to see what is triggering his/her behavior. See if you could come up with a solution on your own with just the student, if not then get the parents involved and see if there is any help that the child could get.
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