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Posted on February 26, 2018 3:01 am
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LuSaNa
LuSaNa
Reps: 200
Group Management and behavior
I run an after care program of 167 students. They are in groups of 25 to one staff member. We have been having a huge problem with control and quieting the students when we are all in the cafeteria for snack time. We do rewards and have a behavior system it just doesn't seem to be working.

Any advice on how to maintain the noise level and get control over the students is appreciated.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 26, 2018 3:21 am

uDaHeD
uDaHeD
Reps: 200
Try to develop some type of communication system with them. For example, one we use frequently with my 6th grades who love to get loud is the "if you can hear my voice, clap once - if you can hear my voice, clap twice" and so on. This typically helps quiet them down. You could also develop a clapping system; when they hear it, they repeat the clapping. Go over the rules of how loud they should be talking and introduce these methods to them. If this isn't working, I'd suggest splitting up some of the groups even more to help keep the noise level down. Hope this helped and good luck !
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WeDyje
WeDyje
Reps: 100
i like this solution, i worked in a daycare and the "if you can hear my voice clap once" really worked.
  Posted on: July 7, 2018 2:24 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 2, 2018 11:52 pm

uDyJeZ
uDyJeZ
Reps: 203
I think the key for this is to communicate expectations before you enter the cafeteria. On your way to snack, remind students that you expect them to be quiet and calm, and offer a reward if the class is able to do this such as 5 extra minutes on the playground or getting to play a specific game they enjoy.
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Solution 3
Posted February 26, 2018 3:54 am

TaTaBy
TaTaBy
Reps: 200
I would have each group teacher create either a hand signal or call out that gets students attention and helps quiet them down. When teachers put their hand in the air it really does help students realize they need to quiet down. Also saying something like "class class" and having students say "yes yes" back does help get their attention and have them focus back on you. Every group can have something different. Also, you could make it a competition like whichever group quiets first gets to go outside first.
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Solution 4
Posted October 4, 2018 8:15 pm

ypaseR
ypaseR
Reps: 201
I third the clapping! That has worked in the Elementary schools that I have volunteered with. Remind your students that it is important for safety that they keep their voices to a good, not yelling level. When you see a child yelling just come stand near them with a little reminder to keep the energy lower. Typically that will work better in a lunch room than hand signals or something not audible.
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Solution 5
Posted October 5, 2018 1:32 am

gypyWe
gypyWe
Reps: 102
There are different applications that allow you to project a sound meter. The meter begins to flash red if it is too loud in the room and stays green if the voice level is acceptable. The teacher is able to set the sound level to what they feel is appropriate. The students can be awarded for the amount of time that they spend in the green. It is engaging for the kids because they get to see the meter working. It is worth a try!
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Solution 6
Posted October 7, 2018 7:35 pm

eqeLeQ
eqeLeQ
Reps: 203
You need to be able to show control even when it is the students "free time". Having a presence by either clapping or raise of a hand to grab attention. Incentives only go so far and will only last for minutes. It is also not noticeable by the other students because they are preoccupied with talking.
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Solution 7
Posted February 20, 2019 6:02 pm

pyMuba
pyMuba
Reps: 202
This sounds like short staffed for this program. A way to control their behaviors is to keep them busy. Whether it be a new game, or separating them into smaller groups within the 25, try to find a way to keep them busy! There is not time to misbehave if they are constantly occupied.
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Solution 8
Posted February 20, 2019 10:18 pm

Lavede
Lavede
Reps: 201
Realistically, I would say that you need to hire more people! I think 25 to 1 is a very hard ratio. I think that is the reason why control is so difficult-there are more students than adults! However, to keep the peace, maybe you could come up with a team system in which they earn points for behaving? Then, whoever has the most points receives a special privilege.
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Solution 9
Posted February 23, 2019 5:48 pm

XuNaWa
XuNaWa
Reps: 202
As an assistant director of a program, I run a program of 150 kids. I feel your pain! When it comes to quieting down these kids, utilize attention getters and implement activities for them to do. I personally have students draw, read a book, do homework, or listen to music on their headphones while snack is going on. This lowers the noise level tremendously.
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Solution 10
Posted February 26, 2018 4:46 am

veXyge
veXyge
Reps: 196
I love the practice of modeling the noise level you want to hear. If you want it quite speak softer. If you want it loud pump up the classroom energy.
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