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Posted on April 20, 2013 1:20 am
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KW1091
KW1091
Reps: 99
Classroom management for students with ADHD
What are some classroom management strategies for a student who has ADHD that would also benefit the whole class as well?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted April 25, 2013 5:24 pm

Ms. Montana
Ms. Montana
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Attention to task is improved when the student with ADHD is engaged in teacher-directed as opposed to independent seat-work activities. Also, the teaching of note-taking strategies increases the benefits of direct instruction. Both comprehension and on-task behavior improve with the development of these skills.
I found this online for you

Classroom Management Strategies for ADHD students website below-hope this helps!

http://tips.atozteacherstuff.com/255/adhd-classroom-management/

Since many children with ADHD have other learning disabilities that tend to be masked by their zany behavior, I would recommend having the boy tested. Maybe part of the reason he is out of control is because the work is too difficult for him (or, alternatively, too easy.)
Give him Playdough or silly putty to play with while you are giving instructions, reading out loud, etc. Or, let him draw or color. This may sound like letting him off the hook, but I have found that many AD/HD people focus better and absorb more of what they hear when they have something to do.
Get the whole class up and moving now and then. I like to have a two minute stretch in the middle of every period. Or, you can use games such as Around the World to practice math facts and get the kids moving at the same time.
Expect him to wiggle. He canít sit completely still, and even if he could, he would be concentrating so hard on doing that that all instructions would go out the window. If other students are distracted by him, put him in the back of the room so he can get up, lean against the wall, etc. If he gets out of his seat and wanders around the room, make sure it is really interfering with instruction before you make him sit down. I have a student who moves to a different chair about every fifteen minutes, but the others have gotten used to this and he gets his work done, and thatís what really counts.
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dePyja
dePyja
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I really like how you address not only the student but also the rest of the class. I like how you get the class out of their chairs as sometimes that is all that needs to be done.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 9:16 pm

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Solution 2
Posted April 23, 2013 2:48 pm

LanuRy
LanuRy
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Each student is going to be different and each case of ADHD is different. Mostly, when I think of students with ADHD I think that they are hyper, they do not like to sit down for a long period of time, and they cannot concentrate for a long period of time. For students like these I would place their desk in the back. That way they can stand at their desk rather than sit down, if they so choose. They will also not be too much of a distraction if they are in the back. After they have been doing something for a while allow them to walk around the room or give them a chance to take a break and use the restroom or get a drink. If the student has a 504 plan you will be able to do more of these things for this student.
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erugyn
erugyn
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I think this solution could be useful for that specific student but I think that the question was about strategies that can be used for the whole class, not just that student.
  Posted on: October 14, 2014 9:35 pm

rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
Right; give the student a chance to move around.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:41 am

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
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Moving around is good for all students, especially ones that have disabilities causing hyperness.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:32 am

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Solution 3
Posted April 25, 2013 2:33 pm

vyLyba
vyLyba
Reps: 101
I agree with the first post, and would add that you could give the student a choice of a couple of seats in the back that he can move to. If he feels a dire need to get out of his seat and move around, at least he or she is out of sight of the other students and within a controlled area. It also works very well to come up with a reward system, which is what I have done with one of my ADHD students this semester. He is one of the students in my middle school SVE class, and loves to play on the PBS website on the computer. He has a sticker chart that he has to fill before he can earn computer time, and it seems to be a great motivator. All I have to do is point to the chart and he is reminded to get it under control. Positive reinforcements are the best strategy!
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Solution 4
Posted October 15, 2014 12:52 am

yLuVaz
yLuVaz
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Something that I think would be beneficial would be to constantly ask questions about the activity were working on and making sure those students are actively listening by calling on them. Also, if they seem to become off task just remind them of what they are supposed to be doing at the moment.
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Solution 5
Posted March 10, 2015 1:11 am

edyRav
edyRav
Reps: 108
When I think of ADHD, I think of students who have trouble sitting still and focusing. I think brain breaks could be a useful tool in the classroom for all students in the classroom, including students with ADHD. Also, you can check for student understanding buy having them stand up/sit down, give a thumbs up/down, etc. to answer yes/no and agree/disagree questions. This not only gives the teacher an opportunity to check for students' understanding, but it gives students a chance to move.
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rybuZy
rybuZy
Reps: 200
Hm, those are some creative ways to get the student involved. Good job.
  Posted on: October 16, 2017 2:42 am

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