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Posted on April 25, 2013 4:13 pm
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VuVyRu
VuVyRu
Reps: 84
Lack of focus
I have a student that I work with in the classroom who will often be playing with some object that she has (and needs) such as a pencil and eraser. Or she will want to talk to me about something off topic (TV shows, animals, etc) while the teacher is instructing the class. I have tried telling her to listen because this is an important topic, and even tried saying "We can talk about this after we are done with the work and the teacher is done talking". However, it seems no matter what I do I cannot get her to pay attention. Any suggestions?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted April 25, 2013 4:46 pm

Ms. Montana
Ms. Montana
Reps: 132
The student is having a hard time paying attention or on task, speak to her other teachers to see if she is doing similar actions. If so, I would speak to the specialist at the school to see if the student have anything in her records indicating a problem. Start with the RTI process with this student but first conference with the parents to see how the student is responding at home.
Votes: +13 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
I would definitely use this solution. Ruling out any possible actual issues is important.
  Posted on: October 14, 2014 7:12 pm

Chelsea
Chelsea
Reps: 101
I would use this solution. I feel that doing your research about students can definitely be beneficial.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 4:59 am

neHaGy
neHaGy
Reps: 200
This is a great solution and I would definitely use it in the future.
  Posted on: October 1, 2015 8:05 pm

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
It is always a good idea to consult your coworkers.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:45 am

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Solution 2
Posted April 25, 2013 7:15 pm

Jon Knox
Jon Knox
Reps: 103
The student may have ADD or something similar. Also, you could try an interest survey to see what interests her, what her learning style is, etc. Then tailor your lessons to make them engaging for her. The fact that she is playing with objects makes me think she could benefit from some other hands on activities as part of your lessons.
Votes: +7 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
This is a good idea, I may try using this in the future.
  Posted on: October 14, 2014 7:11 pm

Edward Gibbs
Edward Gibbs
Reps: 100
I really like this solution. I think all students learn differently and hands on may work for this student.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 3:43 pm

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Solution 3
Posted October 17, 2014 7:28 pm

Vypysy
Vypysy
Reps: 101
Clearly communicating expectations could be a good course of action. If this dies not work there are many strategies to keep this student on task. Proximity control, preferential seating, and behavior contracts are good ways to ensure that the teacher is near and the student knows how to act.
Votes: +3 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Edward Gibbs
Edward Gibbs
Reps: 100
I would use this solution and I like the suggestion of moving the student closer to the teacher. I think this would help to solve the problem.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 3:41 pm

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Solution 4
Posted February 17, 2015 1:50 am

aGuvuL
aGuvuL
Reps: 101
You can implement a reward system. If the students pays attention for the lesson, then they can be rewarded with the item that they were playing with, like the pencil.
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Solution 5
Posted February 23, 2015 12:35 am

TeQaqe
TeQaqe
Reps: 100
I would first re-iterate expectations, and then establish a physical/visual cue, to remind the student they need to be paying attention such as a snap of the fingers.
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Solution 6
Posted October 15, 2014 12:59 am

yLuVaz
yLuVaz
Reps: 102
The first thing I would try and do, is change up my lesson plan to make sure more questions are being asked and doing things that can help that student engaged. If that not working than maybe ADHD is of concern.
Votes: +0 / -9 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

ypuqum
ypuqum
Reps: 207
I do not like this solution. If this is a constant issue than changing your lesson plan or diagnosing ADHD is pointless. The students needs to be evaluated before jumping to conclusions.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 8:12 pm

Chelsea
Chelsea
Reps: 101
I do not agree with this solution. I think teachers are too quick to label students and should try various methods of teaching before jumping to any conclusions.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 4:58 am

Edward Gibbs
Edward Gibbs
Reps: 100
I would not use this solution. I don't think changing the lesson plan will help just this one individual student.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 3:40 pm

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Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.