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Posted on November 28, 2020 7:46 pm
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Marie_21
Marie_21
Reps: 50
Struggling with Impulsivity
One of my students struggles with impulse control. She speaks her mind without a filter, she has trouble with physical control and her voice level. At times, when she loses control she ends up hurting a friend's feelings or accidently hits them. When I talk to her about what happened she doesn't have any reasons for why it happened and she cries if her friend is mad at her. She attempts control for a little while after, but then resorts to her old ways. Any ideas on how to help her?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted December 4, 2020 5:20 pm

Kristen Duffy
Kristen Duffy
Reps: 59
Can you define what you mean by accidentally hitting someone? I am struggling to imagine a situation in which hitting someone would be accidental. Are there certain scenarios in which she is more likely to lose control? I would recommend tracking these occurrences to try to find out what is triggering this type of impulse control and see if you can provide alternative behaviors that would be more suited to the classroom environment.

Additionally, you say that she attempts control for a little while, but then resorts to her old ways. Are these attempts being reinforced. I would look for ways to reinforce any instances of positive impulse control as much as possible, until she is regularly engaging in self-management of her own behavior.
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Stephanie A
Stephanie A
Reps: 54
I completely agree, that more often than not students do not hit "accidentally". Tracking the occurrences of the unwanted behavior is a valuable strategy to further evaluate the student's tendencies.
  Posted on: December 7, 2020 10:53 pm

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Solution 2
Posted December 8, 2020 2:27 pm

Lindsey Hauser
Lindsey Hauser
Reps: 52
I think that more information about the student would be required in order to fully help her. I would consider involving the school psychologist, if your school has one, and look at a possible diagnosis of ADD/ADHD, as others have said. It sounds like there are underlying issues here. But I also agree that positive reinforcement would be beneficial here, as well as self-monitoring.
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Solution 3
Posted December 7, 2020 10:49 pm

Stephanie A
Stephanie A
Reps: 54
I have several questions but my main one would be, does this student have any diagnosis that may lead to their impulsivity? ADHD? ADD? This could be something that they may not be able to control or the result of fidgeting possibly? I have seen where consistent positive reinforcement throughout the day works better than waiting longer periods of time.
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Xetuzu
Xetuzu
Reps: 105
I think this is a good start to help finding a solution
  Posted on: March 4, 2021 2:10 am

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Solution 4
Posted February 28, 2021 4:42 pm

Lauren Toner
Lauren Toner
Reps: 115
This student needs to have intervention immediately and maybe the admin needs to get involved. Physical outbursts that result in hitting another student is not okay. You need to address the student and let the school admin know what is going on and the parents need to be informed and called down to the school for a meeting.
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Solution 5
Posted February 28, 2021 4:44 pm

Lauren Toner
Lauren Toner
Reps: 115
This student may need higher support services and may need to be evaluated for a behavior-related problem so talking to the school counselors and admin in my advice since this behavior is continuous and won't stop.
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Solution 6
Posted February 24, 2021 2:44 am

yMaQuD
yMaQuD
Reps: 101
I think that possibly working with this student individually may help. You can explain/ work through strategies that would help her better and maybe even have that in writing form if that would help her better practice. She may have some troubles at home and her parents may not know what to do and just let it happen, which may be causing her anxiety. Nonetheless, showing her proper ways to react and what to say during scenario practice may better help her work through real life scenarios. She does have to understand that what she says and does has consequences, but I think with time working with her will show some progress.
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Solution 7
Posted February 24, 2021 6:03 pm

SeGyHu
SeGyHu
Reps: 201
I think impulse control is a manifestation of a larger problem. It sounds like the student understands the consequences of her actions, but genuinely has no control over them. I would test the student for an LD or MD. As a teacher in a room full of other students, it is next to impossible to give this one student the help she truly needs.
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Solution 8
Posted March 7, 2021 1:45 pm

yDyVuB
yDyVuB
Reps: 201
This is an issue that should go straight to the parents attention. People are being harmed by her doing and the behavior doesn't seem to be changing. There needs to be a parent/teacher meeting to speak about her unusual behaviors and if there are any underlying causes of it. She feels guilt, she can't control herself.
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Solution 9
Posted November 28, 2020 8:44 pm

Keri C
Keri C
Reps: 87
How well do you know the child outside of the classroom? Have you spoken to her family? There may be something underlying the behavior that needs to be addressed. She needs to understand that hitting is wrong and won't be tolerated. Is she able to understand why her friend is mad at her? Maybe if she could see how she feels when her friend is mad and relate it to how she made the friend feel, she could understand.
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