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Posted on September 21, 2012 12:33 pm
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Jennifer Hong
Jennifer Hong
Reps: 46
Daydreaming
How can I help a child who is constantly daydreaming?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 16, 2012 9:15 am

JemyWe
JemyWe
Reps: 132
First be aware of the fact that perhaps this student is not daydreaming. Although it might look like day dreaming, he/she might still be listening in his/her own way. I would make sure that I circulate the classroom and use non verbal cues to keep this student on task. If need be, I would tap on the student's desk to try and keep him on task. In class when he seems to be daydreaming, I would call on him/her to see if he/she can answer your question or if there is silence. Keep record of when this behavior is apparent to see if it occurs during a specific subject and/or activity. Evaluate the frequency, duration, and intensity of the daydreaming.
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Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This is a good suggestion, keep the student active in classroom discussion.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 6:01 pm

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
I agree that you should always take the different learning styles into account before just assuming that they are not paying attention.
  Posted on: February 22, 2018 7:23 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 2, 2012 5:59 pm

Ashlyn Eddinger
Ashlyn Eddinger
Reps: 121
In order to help a child who is constantly daydreaming, I would initiate a one-on-one talk with the child to find out the source of his daydreaming. Entice the child to participate actively in classroom activities. The teacher can gauge the child's level of understanding by asking him questions connected with the topic discussed. Regularly come up with group work in order for the child to be constantly involved in discussion and activities with his classmates. Use interactive teaching, with the topics related to the children's everyday lives. Use visual aids in your lectures to boost the interest of the children and allow interval breaks during class and engage the children in forms of simple activities and exercises. In addition, be well aware of the different kinds of learning disorders in children that can be risk factors for daydreaming, to be able to recommend professional help.
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Solution 3
Posted October 12, 2012 5:25 pm

Courtney Morra
Courtney Morra
Reps: 118
I have found that giving the student something to do with their hands can get them from constantly daydreaming. You can give them something like play-doh or a squishy ball or something like that that they can play with without thinking about it. This tends to give them something to do and helps them pay attention better and more often.
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erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
I had never thought of this, great idea.
  Posted on: October 18, 2014 8:26 pm

Candice Greene
Candice Greene
Reps: 201
This is a great suggestion that I would use in class.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 6:01 pm

yVuRaR
yVuRaR
Reps: 101
I'm not sure if I agree or not. This method is usually used for student who have ADHD or just generally hyperactive students. If they aren't paying attention because they are fidgety, this would be good. However, if they are just spacing out, I'm not so sure this would work.
  Posted on: October 3, 2016 4:07 pm

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Solution 4
Posted April 18, 2013 7:02 pm

ehyQyD
ehyQyD
Reps: 96
First make sure that the student is daydreaming. Some neurological issues such as epilepsy can look like daydreaming. If they are in fact daydreaming to escape the work at hand then I would not only move their desk, but start engaging them as they are working or during the lesson to let them know that you are keeping an eye on them.
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Chelsea
Chelsea
Reps: 101
I agree that it is important to rule out any other issues that may be happening. When that is done, trying some interesting and hands on lessons may be helpful.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 5:01 am

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Solution 5
Posted October 2, 2012 2:42 pm

uremev
uremev
Reps: 109
I can create lesson that are interactive, which require the students to be involved in a hands-on approach. I could also relocate the student to a seat that is in closer proximity to the front of the class close to the white board. I will also remind the class that they will be called on at various times to either comment or answer a question about our lesson.
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Solution 6
Posted October 2, 2012 2:47 pm

JuPuqe
JuPuqe
Reps: 112
In this scenario I would make sure that the students desk is located away from distractions such as the restroom, sink, or window. I would also create lessons that get my students out of their desks and moving. I would create centers that get students out of their desk and sprawled out across the room instead of confined in their desk.
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Solution 7
Posted October 2, 2012 2:48 pm

JuPuqe
JuPuqe
Reps: 112
In this scenario I would make sure that the students desk is located away from distractions such as the restroom, sink, or window. I would also create lessons that get my students out of their desks and moving. I would create centers that get students out of their desk and sprawled out across the room instead of confined in their desk.
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Solution 8
Posted October 2, 2012 6:56 pm

guPeRu
guPeRu
Reps: 135
I would first try to create a more engaging instruction that is student-centered. If this consist, I would use proximity and consistent questions throughout the lesson. Writing students names on Popsicle sticks and pulling one out when wanting a response can keep students' focused. To lower anxiety, you can can partner Popsicle sticks where the students need to work together to answer the question, creating responsibility.
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Solution 9
Posted October 18, 2014 6:03 pm

SaDeTe
SaDeTe
Reps: 101
Have signals that you give that student each time you notice them drifting off. It could be a simple tap on their desk or a snap with your finger. You don't have to mention their name or say anything that would stop the lesson.
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Solution 10
Posted October 15, 2012 5:26 pm

Rachel Ressler
Rachel Ressler
Reps: 121
I would make sure the student is infront of the board and not the window. I would call on him when I see that I am losing him. Having lessons that intrest the kid or throw in something that I know he likes, like a star wars refrence. Just something that may make him want to listen more. I would also talk to the student about the importance of staying on task and keeping up with whats going on in class.
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Solution 11
Posted February 24, 2015 6:54 pm

Victoria Horn
Victoria Horn
Reps: 201
Keep them on task by asking them to answer a question or giving them a job in the classroom. I would pair them up with partners so that they are constantly interacting with someone so that they don't have time to daydream.
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Solution 12
Posted March 15, 2015 11:01 pm

JuNuBy
JuNuBy
Reps: 101
I have had this same issue this year. One thing I have found effective is to move the student's seat closer to the teacher and to make sure you monitor and redirect him or her. Consistency is key! I have also used a timer in the past to help the student realize how much time they have left. Sometimes this helps them stay on task.
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