TeacherServer.com
Home | How It Works | Stats
Login | Register
     
 
Topic Go Back
 
     
     
 
Case
Posted on October 5, 2012 9:29 am
Add to Favorites Add to Favorites

amaJud
amaJud
Reps: 114
No Support
I know a teacher that has a student who has serious behavior problems. They are currently waiting for the paperwork to go through to find a way to help this student because he is not learning anything in her classroom. Just to give you an idea he will throw chairs at the teacher as well as the students, the other day he ran out of the classroom through the fire escape. As of now she has zero support from her administration, besides chasing him around the school (literally chasing) if he runs out of her classroom. What would you suggest she do?
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.
 
     
     
 
Solution 1
Posted October 14, 2012 10:41 pm

JuPuqe
JuPuqe
Reps: 112
I would first get the parents involved and ask them if they know what may be causing this behavior. I would also try to set up some type of meeting with the administration because this student could hurt not only himself but the teacher and peers as well.
Votes: +8 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
Making the parents involved is a good step.
  Posted on: February 24, 2018 7:11 am

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 2
Posted October 11, 2012 1:03 pm

ynudaq
ynudaq
Reps: 121
I would first have a conference with the parents and try to come up with a solution. Adminstration will sometimes ignore the problem because they feel they have other things to deal with. I would try to come up with a plan with the student in order to help make the student feel like he has a decsion in the process other then chasing the student around the school. For example; if the student needs a break having him do something he enjoys, so maybe he will not get to this frustration level.
Votes: +5 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 3
Posted October 10, 2012 11:06 am

Courtney Morra
Courtney Morra
Reps: 118
I would definitely get the parents involved. If they aren't careful and cannot get it under control depending on how the school is willing to react, the child could potentially get kicked out of that school for harming or potentially harming others.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
I agree with this solution.
  Posted on: October 18, 2014 8:10 pm

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 4
Posted October 15, 2012 4:28 pm

GeJese
GeJese
Reps: 116
This is an unfair situation for everyone involved; the student with the behavior problem isn't learning anything, this must be very distracting for the rest of the class, and the teacher can't teach because they have to chase a student. I think that the teacher needs to reach out to the parents. The parents might be able to let the teacher and adminstration why their child acts out like this, or even ways they cope with their child at home. As of now this student is a physical to threat to everyone in the classroom, and action needs to be taken to protect the other students.
Votes: +4 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 5
Posted October 7, 2012 9:17 am

Kym Toner
Kym Toner
Reps: 103
I think working with the parents may be the first step in this type of situation. This does not require involvement with the administration or going above their heads. Hopefully, with consistent communication regarding the child's behavior, the parents will be willing to take some sort of corrective action. Consulting with the school social worker or guidance counselor could also be useful as they may be able to provide suggestions and/or interventions to help the student.
Votes: +4 / -2 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 6
Posted October 6, 2012 11:58 am

NeDema
NeDema
Reps: 113
You may want to let the parent know that if their child has an episode they will be calling them to come and get the child, for the safety of their child as well as the other children in the classroom. Maybe if the parent continues to have to leave work for their child's behavior they may seek help for their child.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 7
Posted October 6, 2012 12:36 pm

uNaBeZ
uNaBeZ
Reps: 131
She is in a tough situation because not helping the student is unethical and going over the administration could cause issues later on. I think the teacher should try to collect data to figure out why he is behaving in such a way. Before the student can be labeled EBD, the student has to show signs (through data) for at least 6 months and in different surroundings. And I don't think slapping a label on this child will help. The teacher should try to find the root cause of the situation and go from there.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 8
Posted October 9, 2012 6:41 pm

Vivian Winston
Vivian Winston
Reps: 123
I would set up a conference with the parents and the student. Getting support from administration might take some time, but working with the parents may be a positive way of getting them involved in the situation. The student should be present for this meeting because he needs to be held accountable for his actions and how they affect others in the class. The teacher and the parents could set up the proper consequences and reward system that will work best with the student.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 9
Posted October 16, 2012 8:42 am

JemyWe
JemyWe
Reps: 132
I would speak to last years teacher to get a better idea of what the student's likes and dislikes are. In order to keep him in the classroom, you should try to have things within the classroom that he likes. Safety is the biggest issue in this situation and there needs to be some type of proactive and reactive plan. What are you going to do to prevent the student from running out? What would you do if the student does run out? Who will watch your classroom and/or chase after this student? These are questions that will be in this proactive and reactive plan that need answers. I also would try to contact the student's parents to offer suggestions and ideas that can be implemented in the classroom. I might want to start the RTI process for this student in order to get classroom and behavioral supports. I would also still go to the administration for support and continue to explain the situations in the classroom. Keeping records of all the insidents would also be a smart move. Email your administration as well, keep a log of that and now if the administration is still unsupportive, you have everything in writing to prove. You also might want to see what it takes to receieve a teacher's assistant. All of these steps will help you determine what is best for this student and you need to always remember that safety is the biggest issue in this situation.
Votes: +2 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 10
Posted October 16, 2012 9:12 am

NaZyde
NaZyde
Reps: 115
If she is receiving no help from the administration, the teacher should contact members of the district. I would get into contact with the superintendent if I could receive support. If the student is behaving this way in the classroom it is a danger to the other students, and he should not be in the classroom in the first place.
Votes: +1 / -0 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Solution 11
Posted December 9, 2012 6:37 pm

Shankeil Tarver
Shankeil Tarver
Reps: 116
In this situation the parents should be notified right away. Talk to the parents to see if they could help or even take the child to see a doctor to be put on medication for his behavior that will calm him down. You could even try rewarding the child for good behavior to see if that works.
Votes: +1 / -1 Vote Up This Solution Is Useful   Vote Down This Solution Is Not Useful  

Comments posted for this solution

Reply Add a Comment
 
     
     
 
Reply Submit a Possible Solution
Please read response(s) below (if any) before posting your solution.