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Posted on August 18, 2014 4:09 pm
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Aslihan Unal
Aslihan Unal
Reps: 435
Intellectual disability and Spelling Test
Susie has an intellectual disability. She is placed in a self- contained class, but she has been participating in some general education classes. Susie’s 4th grade general education teacher has required her to participate in spelling tests. Susie received a failing grade for the past 4 spelling tests. The teacher has decided to reduce the number of spelling words on Susie’s list. She is only responsible for the single syllable words on the spelling list each week.
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Solution 1
Posted October 16, 2014 3:53 am

eHuJeW
eHuJeW
Reps: 80
I believe the general education teacher has tried to resolve the issue by requiring a lesser number of spelling words and only those of minimal difficulty. However, I think a better solution would be to team with Susie's special education teacher to see what type of expectations would be more appropriate for her intellectual disability. The special education teacher is likely more experienced and holds more knowledge in trying to solve this type of issue. Additionally, the general education teacher could try to discuss the issue with Susie's parents to determine their feelings on the matter and to find out their wishes.
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Solution 2
Posted October 18, 2014 6:25 pm

Lauren Foster
Lauren Foster
Reps: 100
I understand why the general education teacher reduced her number of spelling words but I think there should be more variety. The general education teacher should work with the special education teacher to create a test that requires Susie to spell a few of the less challenging words and then choose the correct spelling out of three or four choices for the more difficult words. Then the student should be given opportunities to practice spelling each word, sounding it out, and identifying each word spelled correctly next to other misspelled options. Allowing practice with both types but with all of the words will help Susie to practice for whichever way she is asked on the test.
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Solution 3
Posted October 19, 2014 11:52 pm

BeSeQa
BeSeQa
Reps: 99
Based on research, tiering is a great way to differentiate all three areas of instruction. The students' IEP should have already called for an accommodation to ensure Susie is accessing the curriculum. The SPED and GEN. Teachers should have addressed this at the beginning of the school year. A better solution is for teachers to collaborate and get to know their students. Thus, plan units or lessons using UDL planning. This planning method leaves not student out or behind.
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