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Posted on October 15, 2012 4:34 pm
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GeJese
GeJese
Reps: 116
Student who avoids subjects
I know a teacher that has a student who constantly goes into the restroom when a subject they do not like it being taught. The student gets up without permission and will lock themself in the restroom for 30 minutes (about the length of the lesson). When the teacher has talked to him about this the student will say that he has to go and that it is an emergency. But this emergency will happen everyday during social studies, so it usually occurs around the same time. How would you handle this situation?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted November 4, 2012 9:44 pm

RyruNe
RyruNe
Reps: 86
Until the teacher is able to find out what is actually wrong with the student and why this “emergency” bathroom occurrence is happening at the same time every day, then the teacher needs to just make the student sit through the lesson. Talking to the student in private could reveal that there is a cultural issue or a religious conflict going on that maybe he is just too afraid to bring up. If this is the case, the issue needs to be discussed with the student and his parents to come up with a solution together so everyone’s personal needs are met. If it is in fact a case where the student just does not want to participate in the class lesson because he does not like the subject or he is bored, the as the teacher you need to lay down the rules and be affirmative when it comes to enforcing them. This includes requiring the student to participate during class lessons, completing assignments that connect to the content to check for comprehension, allowing only a certain amount of bathroom breaks or limiting the amount of time they can spend in the bathroom, and instituting consequences if the inappropriate behavior continues.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
It is always better to talk to the student than just go straight to conclusions.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:04 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 16, 2012 9:02 am

Courtney Morra
Courtney Morra
Reps: 118
It sounds like it might be bigger than the student just being defiant. I would suggest that the student go and talk to the school counselor or guidance counselor. It may be a deeper issue than you may realize.
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Solution 3
Posted October 15, 2012 7:12 pm

Justin Mortenson
Justin Mortenson
Reps: 108
This is situation where you need to have a private conversation with the student. You need to find out the problem, before you can address it. I would assume it could be on of two things. Either the student is a afraid to fail or the student is bored. If the student is afraid to fail you could reaffirm your expectations to the student, which could change the student's attitude in an instant. If the student is bored, you can either challenge the student by providing additional material to study or try and alter the lessons so that they are more interesting.
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Solution 4
Posted October 15, 2012 8:55 pm

JuPuqe
JuPuqe
Reps: 112
First I would ask the student in private why he does not like the subject being taught and see if I can some how help him or change his mind by modifying my lessons.If this does not work I will begin keeping data of the incident and then call in the parents for a conference.
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dePyja
dePyja
Reps: 200
I agree with having a one-on-one talk with the student. It could be more than just them skipping the lesson as stated above. Hopefully having a talk with the student, trying to figure out why they keep using the bathroom during that specific lesson could open a door to a possible solution. I also agree with you on keeping a log on the behavior to present to the parents if it continues.
  Posted on: October 19, 2014 10:27 pm

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Solution 5
Posted October 16, 2012 6:11 am

uNaBeZ
uNaBeZ
Reps: 131
I would first start by meeting with the student on a one-on-one basis to discuss the situation. I would tell the student that you recognize the pattern so you have arranged for him or her to use the bathroom before you start your lesson to minimize distraction and enhance learning in our community. If the problem persists, I would reach out to the parents during the next available mini-break and let them know what is going on. They can tell you if their student has an important issue regarding their bladder. If the parent tells you that there is no reason for their child to continue going to the bathroom, you can tell the student you contacted their parents and there is no reason for them to get up. After that, you need to strictly enforce behavior such as giving the student extra homework regarding SS since they missed the content. If they don't do it, I am certain their parents will get involved after seeing an F on their progress report.
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Solution 6
Posted October 16, 2012 9:03 am

NaZyde
NaZyde
Reps: 115
It sounds like the student is not understanding the material, or is uncomfortable about the material. The teacher should privately speak to the student and ask them what is wrong. After speaking to them, it might also be helpful to speak to their parents.
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ypuqum
ypuqum
Reps: 207
I agree that the student needs to be pulled aside and spoken to about the issue.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 8:56 pm

erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
Great solution!
  Posted on: October 18, 2014 8:05 pm

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Solution 7
Posted February 13, 2013 9:58 pm

TaHazy
TaHazy
Reps: 115
I would question how certain the teacher is that this is subject avoidance. It seems like a rather drastic measure for it to occur daily and without permission. What is the transition before this lesson? Is it another lesson or is it lunch, gym, or other social activity? If so it is quite possible something is occurring during that time that is effecting the child directly after. They could be lonely, being bullied, or any number of things. the point is that there could be a great number of reasons for this behavior other than task avoidance. I would try to rule some of those out before I began looking into the possibility that it has something to do with social studies.
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Solution 8
Posted February 25, 2013 1:23 pm

eruHeB
eruHeB
Reps: 96
Try changing the time frame that you have planned out for social studies to figure out if the students really is trying to avoid the subject. If the student has just returned from lunch or recess, the student may simply just need to go during that time frame. Depending on the students diet the school food may "go right through him" and he decides to stay in the bathroom until the smell goes away in fear of being made fun of or bullied.
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ypuqum
ypuqum
Reps: 207
I agree with switching the time of social studies and see if the student is really avoiding it.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 8:55 pm

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Solution 9
Posted October 15, 2012 5:23 pm

Rachel Ressler
Rachel Ressler
Reps: 121
I would ask the student right out what is wrong? What is the problem when it comes to social studies? I would ask the student if they can think of ways that I can better teach lesson to get across to him better. Most kids will say social studies is boring, maybe I would do something to liven up the lesson. Like a play or a game using history that we are learning about. If the student tried to leave again, I would follow him out and say "just give it a try see how it goes."
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Solution 10
Posted December 8, 2012 8:28 am

Kristine Morris
Kristine Morris
Reps: 153
Well, my question is how is the student leaving without any consequences. Is the principals getting envolved to help control the student from leaving on his own. I would need to have a conversation with the student, parents, and me to find out what is going on with subject concerning social studies. What has happened previously to make the student possibly dislike the subject that much to make him leave on his own and not come back until it was over. Or, is there something more going on during that time that he goes to the bathroom. There is a lot of questions up in the air that looks like needs to be answered
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Solution 11
Posted October 16, 2012 9:23 am

edaPab
edaPab
Reps: 147
I would only have a certain number of bathroom passes. This way only that many kids can go to the bathroom at a time. I would also maybe make a time limit on the passes.
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eWaPyH
eWaPyH
Reps: 100
I have the children wait until the next student comes back. Regardless of gender. One student at a time.
  Posted on: April 18, 2013 7:11 pm

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Solution 12
Posted December 9, 2012 6:25 pm

Shankeil Tarver
Shankeil Tarver
Reps: 116
During this time that it is time for social studies class, allow all students to use the restroom before class start. Also, allow a break between class to see if any students have to go again and tell them these are the only times they could go. If you do this then it will cut back on students walking out when teaching is going on.
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Solution 13
Posted October 16, 2012 8:32 am

ynudaq
ynudaq
Reps: 121
I would give out bathroom passes to each student and explain that you only have a certain amount of times to go each month.
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ypuqum
ypuqum
Reps: 207
Yu can not prohibit a student from going to the bathroom if they really need to go.
  Posted on: October 16, 2014 8:54 pm

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