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Posted on October 3, 2014 2:42 am
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Zafer Unal
Zafer Unal
Reps: 965
Special education services under certification as emotionally impaired
Doug is a fifth grade student. He is of average size and height for his grade. Doug receives special education services under certification as emotionally impaired. Doug has a variety of behaviors that he exhibits throughout the day on a daily basis. He typically has a lot of energy and spends time each time going to the RTC room at school – Responsible Thinking Classroom. On one particular day, Doug in his general education class and he is repeatedly getting out of his seat. His teacher (whom you will respond as –either as yourself or critiquing his/her “interventions)has repeatedly instructed him to remain seated, but every 3 to 5 minutes Doug either makes an attempt to get up and sharpen his pencil, get a drink, or squirm about in his chair. What is next?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted February 16, 2015 11:51 pm

abypaN
abypaN
Reps: 103
I had a student who had similar actions during one of my internships, but it was written in his IEP that he would receive a reasonable amount of breaks. I always encouraged him to get more work done by saying, "Complete five more problems and let me check them and then I will let you (get up for whatever the reason was)." This worked well and often times he would forget what he was wanting to get up for. I also spoke to his father and asked him what types of sit down activities he did at home and tried to give him more incentives when he stayed in his seat and completed his work. For Doug, I would probably try to pair him up with a peer that is high functioning and who generally finishes their work early, preferably a person that Doug wants to interact with, to help him keep his attention focused.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
Pairing up is always a good idea.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:46 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 15, 2014 1:14 am

yLuVaz
yLuVaz
Reps: 102
I think what should be done next, is to pull him out of class and speak with him about why he is always getting out of his seat. I would tell him he can keep a water bottle at his desk if he's thirsty all the time. If this does not work, then I would try a parent teacher conference.
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Solution 3
Posted October 4, 2015 3:10 pm

Qebysu
Qebysu
Reps: 203
In situations such as this some students may just get work done better if they are allowed a little more freedom. In this situation for me I would allow Doug to get up at certain points after he has completed a measurable amount of work. This is important because not every student is able to just stay seated the whole class and may need interventions.
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Solution 4
Posted February 25, 2019 3:28 am

ReLeve
ReLeve
Reps: 200
I think the pairing up of students is a great idea! However you have to remember sometimes students can amp each other up, even your most responsible. This student sounds like he could definitely benefit from "brain breaks"! Have him work for something tangible, not too crazy, and not beyond his limit. My favorite go to strategy are "if, then" statements. "IF you sit quietly and do your work for 15 min, THEN you may get a brain break for 5". The breaks could be watching one GoNoodle video, an educational card game, etc. Just something that lets him move and use his body beneficially. If he is still getting out of his seat during work time, remind him what he is working for and if he is making good choices or poor choices towards earning that. Often times I will ask my kids "Do you think that was a good choice or a poor choice?" That way they have to think about it. If they just say good choice, ask them why they think that was good. More times than not they won't want to answer all those question again and will readjust themselves.
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