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Posted on October 3, 2014 2:49 am
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Zafer Unal
Zafer Unal
Reps: 957
Know it all
Every class has one: a "know it all." Well, in class I had a student who thought she was the gift to the classroom and knew absolutely everything about everything. We were doing a pair share activity and she was completely insulting one of the students in her group who didn't really feel like participating. On one hand, the girl was being overly mean, but on the other hand the student wasn't doing what he was supposed to do. I was wondering if I should tell the student to calm down and not worry about the other student, or should I tell the unmotivated student to buck up and do the work? Either choice seems to have its draw backs and I can't really tell both of them to leave each other alone and do the work because then they will both be upset with me and not do the work.
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 15, 2014 1:10 am

yLuVaz
yLuVaz
Reps: 102
For the "know it all" student, I would pull her aside and let her know that we should be respectful of others, because we would want them to do the same to us. I would also let the other student know that there will always be a person that is going to criticize you in life, but you cant let it hold you back. You have to stand up for what you believe in.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Yes she must know when it is appropriate to shout out answers etc. Maybe rules or procedures would help.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 4:10 pm

Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
She should still have to follow the rules.
  Posted on: February 25, 2018 6:52 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 14, 2014 1:07 am

PavuWe
PavuWe
Reps: 99
I would tell both students that in a real-world setting, we have to work with groups all the time. We don't always get to choose who we will work with, but whether we like our group or not, the work is expected to be completed. After talking with the students I would split the project into pieces and assign each group member a piece to complete on their own. I would tell each of them that they will be graded solely on the work that they contribute to the project. After the project is completed, I would talk to them both again about the importance of being able to work with others, and many times it is much more fun and efficient to be able to work together.
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erugyn
erugyn
Reps: 100
I like your solution. Both students are in the wrong, allowing the one student to do nothing or the other student to be rude is not okay. By talking to both students and then assigning specific work to each one you ensure that everyone is responsible for their own work and know what is expected of them.
  Posted on: October 14, 2014 6:56 pm

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Solution 3
Posted February 19, 2015 6:46 pm

uHugyT
uHugyT
Reps: 100
I would actually address both students separately. I would first call the know it all to my desk and ask them to be respectful of other people's feelings and if she has a problem with another student in the group not doing their work, to tell the teacher. I would then call over the other student and ask them to make sure that they are doing their part in the group. In the future, you could assign individual roles to each person in the group so that the know it all isn't responsible for the other person's work, and the unmotivated student's grades will suffer if they expect other students in the group to pick up the slack.
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Solution 4
Posted March 6, 2015 5:19 pm

ymuZuG
ymuZuG
Reps: 101
I would have a talk privately with both of these students. For the know it all I would talk to them about respecting other peoples feeling and not being mean to their classmates. To the unmotivated student, I would talk to them about participating in their groups. I would let them know that is they don't participate they will not get a good grade. I also would not put these two people in a group together in the future because it is obviously not working for them. As far as the students being upset with me, it is more important that they both be learning to their full potential than they both be happy with me at all times.
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Solution 5
Posted February 21, 2015 7:52 pm

uLuqup
uLuqup
Reps: 100
I would talk to and address both students individually and privately about their behaviors--both need to know that they are not acting appropriately and if it continues to go on, it will reflect in their grade. If a group has this issue, I would also consider having ready a scale that you can use to deduct points for participation and group cooperativeness; maybe deduct 2 or 3 points at first, but if problems continue then 5 or more points will be taken off from the whole group's score. It is important for students to know that they need to learn to work with others cooperatively even if they may not want to or like them because this is an important skill that they will need if they want to be successful in their professional (and social) futures.
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Solution 6
Posted February 22, 2015 5:24 pm

abypaN
abypaN
Reps: 103
I have two sons and I would deal with this situation in the same way I have had to deal with it at home. I would speak to the "know it all" and let them know how proud I am of them for always trying their best, but then I would ask them, "How do you think you are making your classmates feel when you say these insulting things to them?" Then I would say, "Please help me by showing me what a good leader you can be and by encouraging your teammates to participate rather than discouraging them." Usually, dealing with the unacceptable behavior of one can change the unacceptable behavior of the other. I would also check back with them more frequently and check to see if the group is working more positively after that.
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eQyVuj
eQyVuj
Reps: 200
Great suggestion. Thanks for adding in your personal experience.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 4:10 pm

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Solution 7
Posted October 1, 2015 6:48 pm

Sutede
Sutede
Reps: 101
Teamwork building seems to be the solution for this problem. During morning or community sharing time, review the rules and procedures that students must follow when in participating in cooperative learning groupings. Explain that we all have great ideas that we would like to share, but we must be respectful and allow everyone in the group to have the opportunity to join in on the discussions. If the problem persists, talk to the student privately. As for the student who is uncooperative; why? Were they being overshadowed by the student with the more dominant personality, is the student ESOL, etc? Both situations need to be addressed, but respectfully and privately.
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