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Posted on October 13, 2014 3:13 pm
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Megan Good
Megan Good
Reps: 94
Test Retake
For each unit test, I allow a retake. I student must see me for tutoring (or their own tutor) prior to retaking the unit test. I have had a few students take advantage of the retake and allowing them to boost their average quite a bit. However, I still have a handful of students who scored very low on their unit test who have not come for tutoring, shown any interest in retaking the unit test and have scored very low in math the past few years in middle school (looking on SLDS). I thought maybe contacting parents and making them aware of their child's low average in math would help them encourage the student at home. So far, nothing. What should I do from here. I hate to let it slide and it come down to the end of the semester and it be too late for them to do anything?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 13, 2014 6:10 pm

Jessica Warren
Jessica Warren
Reps: 103
This seems to be a common problem in education today. Students are complacent and seem happy "just to pass." Or, if the low assessment grade does not pull their grade down to failing, they will not make the effort. I believe a possible solution would be to gain parent involvement. Sending home weekly/bi-weekly detailed grade reports, requiring parents to sign them, and have the students return them would be a start. Often, especially in high school, the parents are not involved in their child's education nearly as much as they need to be. Offering frequent grade reports not only gives the parents an idea of where the child stands in your class, but also gives you documentation for those students that are doing poorly in your class.
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Vypysy
Vypysy
Reps: 101
It sounds like your students are having problems connecting to the curriculum. It may help to have students take ownership of the curriculum by having them develop learning objectives for each unit. This should help increase student motivation. Accounting for cultural diversity by teaching material that connects to a variety of cultural backgrounds could also help students engage in the material.
  Posted on: October 17, 2014 3:19 pm

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Solution 2
Posted October 18, 2014 11:14 pm

aWeRun
aWeRun
Reps: 104
I would suggest students who do not take advantage of the tutoring and continue to fail must come in for tutoring during their free time such as recess or activities that they are allowed to miss.
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Solution 3
Posted October 14, 2014 1:20 am

GyNuny
GyNuny
Reps: 90
Depending on the grade, I would try to find something that motivates the particular student. For example, students who score an 80% or better are allowed to eat with a friend at lunch or take their shoes off during the day in the classroom and walk around in their socks. I know it sounds silly, but any little thing that can motivate them to want to do better will help. This is easy for my because my students are in kindergarten, but upper grades choose to impress their peers more than the teacher. Try to get them accountable for their test scores and such. Allow them to set goals for themselves and when they meet that goal they are rewarded in some way. This helps them to be accountable for their own learning. It sounds like a lack of motivation that you are dealing with!
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Solution 4
Posted October 13, 2014 8:52 pm

Michael Brown
Michael Brown
Reps: 103
Hello again, ygepyt,
Kudos for you for making sure Mastery of content occurs. That's what matters; not the extra work. In my course, while it may hinder them for learning the "hard way" I allow students to continue to attempt assignments until they receive an 80, provided obvious and timely effort is shown in the first attempt. I have found that students need real world examples on how NOT mastering information can take a tole on them and their lives... Perhaps find someone who just passed that you know from high school or your family... Allow them to visit your classroom and explain their post-high school experiences. These can be positive (learned from it in college that I was not prepared) or negative (can't find stable and consistent work within the means I wish to live). This will really help your students and motivate them to be all they can be.

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Solution 5
Posted October 19, 2014 11:01 pm

eHatuv
eHatuv
Reps: 100
My school system has a mandated retake policy for students that do not meet mastery level determined by each of their local schools or departments. We first try to contact parents about this as well then we look at the extra-curricular activities the student is involved in and get their coach or sponsor to have conversations about taking advantage of this policy. If none of those options are working or available we look to our Communities-In-School (CIS) coordinator to get this child a mentor to help them understand the importance of school.
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Solution 6
Posted October 15, 2014 9:00 pm

aZazaD
aZazaD
Reps: 95
I would first take a part of the day away that the student loves to participate in such as P.E. or recess. Some students will then love to get extra help when it comes to retaking their unit tests. I have even offered my students a five dollar McDonald's card if they score well on their unit tests. I have found my students to really want to try and work hard when they take these types of tests. The students will then take their time and work hard to find a solution to a given problem on the math test.
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