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Posted on September 26, 2012 1:11 pm
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Matthew Sollers
Matthew Sollers
Reps: 63
Blurting Out
The year has gotten off to a great start except for one thing. In one of my classes, I have a student who seems too eager to please, and blurts out answers to questions whenever I try to have a teacher-led discussion. What should I do?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 2, 2012 2:56 pm

ynudaq
ynudaq
Reps: 121
The rules and procedures should be set the first day of school. There should be consequences that should be followed each time the student breaks this rule. The other students should know the rules and the consequences and know that this is not allowed and if they choose to do so they will have to follow the same consequence given to this student.
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Jenna Herberson
Jenna Herberson
Reps: 200
Having rules and guidelines and following through with consequences will definitely help.
  Posted on: February 24, 2018 6:23 am

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Solution 2
Posted October 2, 2012 4:03 pm

GeJese
GeJese
Reps: 116
I would review the classroom rules and procedures with the students again, but instead of reading them out loud my self I would have different students in the class read them. I would also talk to the student privately about blurting out, and try to find out why he continues to do so. Once I know why the issue keeps occurring then I will know what the best solution will be.
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Solution 3
Posted October 2, 2012 2:59 pm

JemyWe
JemyWe
Reps: 132
If I were in your position, I would just ignore the student blurting out. I would ask my question and call on the student who is waiting patiently with his/her hand up. After calling on him/her, I would then say something along the lines of "Jenny, I like the way you waited with your handup silently" or "Jenny, thank you for raising your hand". This might then model the correct way to wait patiently instead of blurting out answers. Once see that the student who is blurting out raise their hand, I would automatically praise that student for raising their hand and waiting patiently. I would also have activities that allow the students to talk freely and not have to worry about raising their hands to speak.
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Solution 4
Posted October 3, 2012 2:57 pm

Kym Toner
Kym Toner
Reps: 103
I would re-state the classroom policy and emphasize that calling out means other students aren't getting a chance to think. I would also explain that since calling out is not appropriate, any students that do it will receive one warning and then a reduction in points or whatever the classroom management behavior plan may be. It is very important to consistently discipline students for this behavior right away and not make exceptions.
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Solution 5
Posted November 4, 2012 10:22 pm

RyruNe
RyruNe
Reps: 86
As the teacher, you need to find a way to get this student to follow the correct procedure for answering. While it is difficult feeling like we are denying our students the chance to answer every question, they need to learn at an early age that there are other students in the class who know the answer also and all students need equal opportunity to participate. With this being the case, it is important for all students to know and understand that, even though they know the answer or have the solution, they will not always be called on. This is something that can be explained in a one-on-one conversation with the student after class. However, during the activity, discussion, or lesson, it is important to let the student know that they are not following your rules and are not being fair to the other students in class. This can be done by approaching the student quietly and reminding them in their ear what the rules are and that they need to change their behavior. This way they will not be embarrassed in front of the others and they can be reminded of the appropriate way to answer a question. If you feel the need to allow the student the opportunity to answer every question, give them a dry-erase sentence strip and tell them to write the answer and then hold it up in the air. This way, other students can have an opportunity to raise their hands and answer.
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Solution 6
Posted October 2, 2012 2:49 pm

David Corrigan
David Corrigan
Reps: 137
The way I would try to solve this problem is to meet privately with the student. I would tell the student that each time they blurt out an answer they will get a mark on a check sheet. The check sheet would have ten squares to pt marks. Once the check sheet is filled up the student would receive a reprimand. The type of reprimand would be an agreed upon deterrent from both the teacher and the student. By having a agreed upon deterrent, this would help by building a commitment between the teacher and the student.
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Solution 7
Posted December 8, 2012 9:38 pm

Kristine Morris
Kristine Morris
Reps: 153
I would try to give that student incentives. For example, if they do not blurt out answers the whole class period, they ear a point. Or, if they raise their hand to earn a point. Then after a while, if they earn so many points then they can trade those points in and get a reward for it. I have been using this in my high school classes and they love it...
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Solution 8
Posted October 6, 2012 12:09 pm

NeDema
NeDema
Reps: 113
When this occurs you can ignore the behavior unless it is disruptive. You cna continually remind them of the classroom rule that they all wrote about raising your hand to answer questions. Also, remind and implement the consequence that follows this behavior. Call on the child when he does raise his hand to let him know that he can contribute when and if he follows the rules.
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Solution 9
Posted October 16, 2012 6:14 am

uNaBeZ
uNaBeZ
Reps: 131
Remind students that you would like to see what everyone knows to encourage discussion. Also, remind students of the school and classroom rules of being respectful and enforce them! If the student continues to blurt out, you need to address this issue and reprimand the behavior. It is not appropriate to disrupt the learning of others.
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Solution 10
Posted April 18, 2013 6:46 pm

ZeNyJe
ZeNyJe
Reps: 101
I would set up a positive reinforcement system that rewards him when he is on task and not blurting out. Also I would give him praise when he raises his hand before speaking. You could also set a timer for 20 minutes and reward student after so many minutes of not blurting out. Have a discussion with the student and explain that the other students need to answer also and it is disrespectful to blurt answers out.
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Solution 11
Posted October 2, 2012 3:52 pm

atuLyD
atuLyD
Reps: 111
I would want to review the classroom rules with the student and remind him that if he wants to answer the question that he needs to raise his hand and not blurt out the answer to the class. If the student keeps doing it, then give consequences to the student. If the student has minimized his blurts or does not blurt in class, then I would reward the student for good behavior.
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