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Case
Posted on October 15, 2014 3:30 pm
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MaZyjy
MaZyjy
Reps: 122
Repeater still struggles
Mrs. Smith has an 8th grade student in her ELA classroom that has had an emotional past and also suffers physically. This studentís mother was killed in a tragic car accident 6 years ago. She has a history of sex abuse by a family member 2 years ago. Along with these terrible experiences, she has a speech problem that cannot be fixed and expresses family feuds continually with Mrs. Smith. This is the studentís second year in 8th grade. She cannot focus and even talks under her breath to her self in class without being a distraction. She struggles continually in class and especially on tests. Mrs. Smith has talked with guidance but only gets that she doesnít qualify for special education. What are some suggestions you might offer Mrs. Smith for this student?
 
     
     
 
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Solution 1
Posted October 15, 2014 4:50 pm

Megan Good
Megan Good
Reps: 94
I know that you have talked with guidance. However, have the appropriate steps and tests been taken in order to prove they cannot qualify for SPED? Is this student in speech? That may be something to look into. If both of those have been looked at and answered and nothing in that area can be done, I would just continue to encourage the student. I would sit the student near me if I was a teacher and continue to guide her through her work. I would get on the phone and continue to ask for encouragement at the home front. None of this can hurt. Also, maybe sharing a story that you know of, where it has affected you in a way can be helpful. Sometimes it helps to know that you (as a student) are the only one hurting. They may need a line that can connect them with others.
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Solution 2
Posted October 15, 2014 11:59 pm

syQase
syQase
Reps: 118
I suggest that you speak again with guidance about getting some counseling for the student and possibly the family. The issue may have nothing to do with academics. It seems as if she has emotional issues. If guidance doesn't hear you then talk to your principal. A meeting with family members is needed to see if this is taking place at home too. Continue to be an advocate for this student because it seems like she really needs so help and no one is paying attention.
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Solution 3
Posted October 16, 2014 1:25 am

Lauren Foster
Lauren Foster
Reps: 100
I suggest that Mrs. Smith asks her to come in early or stay late 10-15 minutes at least twice a week. You can use that time to review skill in class and give her the chance to ask questions. Another suggestion is to give her a journal where she can express her feelings. If she is able to express her feelings before class than she might be able to focus more. This is something that the counselor should be able to help with. My last suggestion is to allow her to take her tests without other students in the room. This would take time and need to be added to an RTI. Hopefully, by documenting her progress with accommodations the special education testing process may begin.
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Danielle Brock
Danielle Brock
Reps: 100
I agree with this case study. I will utilize this information once I become a teacher.
I enjoyed reading this idea.
  Posted on: March 1, 2015 10:57 pm

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